Trump threatens the media on Twitter

President Trump speaking at a rally. Courtesy of Pixabay.

President Donald Trump recently tweeted a threat to revoke broadcast network FCC licenses, which could be a cause for concern for media organizations.

It troubles news sources and defenders of the First Amendment that Trump is attacking a fundamental democratic right even though he does not have the power to revoke FCC licenses, and the FCC does not license individual networks, according to their website.

Trump repeatedly criticized the media while campaigning for president, and his attacks have only increased since taking office.

One of his most affecting comments came in February, when he declared the media an enemy.

How did it come to this?

The media has conducted itself as the fourth estate for centuries. Which means, ethically, it must act as an objective party that keeps checks and balances on the government by always reporting the truth, according to the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics.

According to the Constitution, the president and Congress has to take an oath of office before representing the country. It states they must support and defend everything in the Constitution. Which includes freedom of speech and freedom of the press.

Two promises.

Two separate entities, swearing to act on the public’s behalf.

So, who is following through?

A recent Reynolds Journalism Institute poll shows that about two-thirds of the public are either likely, or very likely to trust the mainstream media.

A CNN poll from August found that three-quarters of all Americans do not trust the majority of information that the White House releases.

Since Gallup began polling Americans, the highest rating of confidence  was in 1976 when 72 percent of Americans trusted the media. The public’s trust in the media has steadily declined since 2007, and it dropped heavily in 2015.

However, recent trends indicate that the public has begun to trust the media again, according to the Reynolds Journalism Institute poll.

The Pew Research Center says the highest rating of trust in government (from 1958 until 2017) was in 1964, when 77 percent of Americans reported that they could trust the federal government.

However, trust in government dipped under 20 percent during the Clinton and Obama administrations. Sudden peaks or valleys in these confidence ratings generally occur after a scandal or national event, such as Clinton’s impeachment and 9/11.

The public does not overwhelmingly trust the government or journalists, which should be a concern because the public is the most important audience for each of them.

What does Twitter think?

Both Trump and the media has critics and supporters when it comes to Twitter .

Regardless, the public is consistently going back and forth about whether the president, or the media, is justified.

Unfortunately, there does not seem to be an end in sight for the war between Trump and the media.

ESPN recently suspended one of its personalities, Jemele Hill, for tweeting about the NFL’s national anthem protest.

Trump targeted Hill. He tweeted about ESPN and the NFL dozens of times in response to the anthem protests and her tweets.

But, Hill has also previously criticized Trump.

The fighting continues, and the low jabs on both sides will probably not help matters.

Trump and the media have gone back and forth several times. Infographic by Katie Ebner.

#MeToo: Social media hashtags and their impact

Photo by: Megan Holzwarth

During the last weeks of October, the Me Too campaign trended as social media users added the #MeToo hashtag to their posts to show solidarity and empathy for those who have experienced sexual assault or harassment.

The campaign surfaced when The New York Times published an article on Oct. 5 that recounted stories of American film producer Harvey Weinstein and years of sexual misconduct. Since then, 76 women have come forward, accusing Weinstein of various forms of sexual assault. These women, mostly actresses, include Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow.

The #MeToo hashtag has allowed these celebrities and other women to speak up about what has happened to them. The hashtag has also been used to recount sexual assault experiences other than those related to Weinstein.

Screen capture: Alyssa Milano’s Twitter

The Me Too movement didn’t start with the Weinstein case. Activist Tarana Burke began the movement over 10 years ago. Burke started this movement to help women from low income communities who have been sexually assaulted or harassed.

“Burke founded Just Be Inc., ‘a youth organization focused on the health, well being and wholeness of young women of color,’ in 2006 and launched the ‘Me Too’ campaign,” according to a USA Today article. “Burke’s goal was to let women who have suffered sexual abuse, assault or exploitation know that they are not alone and to build an extended network of women who could empathize with survivors.”

Women are not only using the hashtag, but so are men. This is a way for men to stand up for women, with some sharing their own stories as victims of sexual assault. Some male celebrities who have used the hashtag include actors Jensen Ackles and Jim Beaver.

Screen capture: Jensen Ackles’ Twitter

Other than the #MeToo hashtag, the #IBelieveYou hashtag has also surfaced. This hashtag has allowed people to help stand up for survivors through a show of support and validation.

The #IBelieveYou campaign began two years ago by the Association of Alberta Sexual Assault Services, which aims to provide a voice for victims of sexual abuse.

“[The campaign] has now taken hold in campuses and communities across the province, reaching nearly 7 million people online,” according to the AASAS website. “Even better, we’re changing attitudes and behavior.”

The #NOMORE hashtag has also trended as of late. This campaign also focuses on voicing instances of sexual assault while aiming to end domestic violence.

“A project of NEO Philanthropy, NO MORE is dedicated to getting the issues of domestic violence, sexual assault and abuse out of the shadows and encouraging everyone — women and men, youth and adults, from all walks of life — to be part of the solution, ” according to the NO MORE website.

NO MORE was launched in 2013 and has since worked with advocacy groups, governmental agencies, universities and other corporations to put an end to domestic violence and sexual assault.

The Me Too campaign, as well as other movements against sexual assault, are for women to know they are not alone. Through these movements, women can let their voices be heard; they don’t have to be silent.