Pasco County Fair Association celebrates 71st annual fair

The Ferris Wheel. Photo taken by Mila Cordeiro.

Pasco County hosted its 71st annual fair in Dade City this past weekend.

The Pasco County Fair began its development in 1947, opening for the first time in 1948. The five businessmen, who created the fair came together to buy the fairgrounds. They wanted to showcase youthful talent.
 
“The five men created the Pasco County Fair Association,” said Annual Fair Chairman Tracy J. Thompson. “The association is not owned by the county. It is privately owned by the association, which people get confused about.”
There are five buildings on the fairgrounds dedicated to the original members.
To keep the fair running, there are hundreds of unpaid volunteers that work together. The board itself has 30 members who volunteer their time to help run the countywide event.
 
“It takes a village to put on the fair for seven days,” said Thompson.
Children can enjoy events such as plant showings and sales, a hog show, a steer show, art exhibits, entertainment, food, and rides from the midway.
 
This year’s entertainment included shows such as The Fearless Flores Thrill Show, Robinson’s Racing Pigs and Extreme Illusions & Escapes. As for food, you could find funnel cakes, french fries, candy apples, pizza and boiled peanuts.


“For the past 12 to 14 years, we’ve had the PRCA Rodeo,” said Thompson. “This year we’re having what’s called the Ranch Rodeo, which will be ran a little differently.”

The Ranch Rodeo will consist of a group of men that will exhibit the different competitions that make up a regular rodeo.
The fair lasts for seven days and begins its first day on Presidents Day. Since the intention is to bring the youth together, the fair accommodates its opening times for children in the area. The fair opens at 4 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. Saturday and noon Sunday.
 
This year brought sponsors such as Covanta Energy, Kim Browne Dade City, Jarrett Ford Dade City, TECO and Pepsi.
 

“The biggest thing that I want people to take away from the fair is that it’s put on by a volunteer organization,” said Thompson. “It is not related to or run by the county.”

The fairgrounds hosts other events such as Sparklebration, weddings, parties and gun shows. These events assist with the upkeep of the grounds.

Interested in volunteering? Want to discover what other events the Pasco County Fairgrounds offers? Visit their website at www.pascocountyfair.com.

Florida Focus News Break April 2, 2018

In this news brief: A murder investigation is underway after a woman is found dead in Manatee County; a Sarasota man is shot after aiming a pellet gun at police; gas prices are climbing; a new Seminole Heights restaurant has patrons talking with interesting menu options; and people around the Bay Area are wearing blue for World Autism Day.

 

French bakery flourishes in downtown St. Pete

 

Streets along the Tampa Bay waterfront flood with a mixture of tropical colors. Hues of greens, blues and yellows pop against the cloudless sky on Beach Drive.

Skyscraping condos and small businesses share the small spaces between the land and the bay. The streets are littered with cars and small motorized bikes. The sun shines on shoppers eagerly entering and leaving the intricately decorated stores while strolling the sidewalks during the bright and humid afternoons.

Nestled directly in the middle of all the bustle and excitement is a taste of France.

Cassis Bakery is part of what used to be called Cassis American Brasserie. Its new name is Cassis St. Pete to avoid confusion and connect with the local culture. Cassis Bakery’s pastry chef, Katherine Williams, says the French-style restaurant is very convenient.

“Brasserie is sort of a thing in France that caters to all different times of the day,” said Williams. “Whether you want to get a cup of coffee, come in and get breakfast, or if you want to come in and have a nice dinner and a glass of wine, a brasserie caters to all that.”

Williams became the pastry chef at Cassis after her boss stepped down in January 2017. She graduated from USF with a degree in English but decided to pursue pastry at the Art Institute of Tampa after falling in love with her college hobby.

Starting at Cassis right after graduating, she now manages the entire bakery. Her responsibilities include scheduling, ordering inventory and recipe testing.

“I like to make sure we have seasonal stuff that’s fresh, Florida flavors, which we didn’t have much of before,” said Williams. “But also keeping a balance of French traditional style.”

This is the fruit tart at the Cassis Bakery on Beach Drive in St. Pete. Photo taken by Rachel Rowan.

The Cassis Bakery is a completely separate business from their savory counterpart, which is a French-American style restaurant that is one swinging door away from the quaint French bakery.

Running the kitchen is Chef Jeremy Duclut. He offers French fare such as French onion soup, braised escargot and a croque monsieur. Duclut also offers Bahn Mi sliders, fried chicken and a roasted cauliflower head. It is a menu that seems to appeal to every palette.

Not only is Cassis a region in France, it is also a food ingredient known as black currant. It carries the same flavor as a dark grape or sour blueberry. Both the bakery and restaurant carry on the Cassis namesake by including the flavor into their recipes.

Williams said that Cassis’ recent brand modernization shows that the restaurant and bakery dedicate themselves to bringing fresh flavors to the locals. At the same time, the brasserie is still dedicated to its French culinary traditions with a light American twist.

Both the bakery and the restaurant plan to remain a St. Pete staple and will continue to serve the community. Not only does Cassis love their patrons, it also loves their fellow businesses. The bakery tries to collaborate whenever possible.

Trump threatens the media on Twitter

President Trump speaking at a rally. Courtesy of Pixabay.

President Donald Trump recently tweeted a threat to revoke broadcast network FCC licenses, which could be a cause for concern for media organizations.

It troubles news sources and defenders of the First Amendment that Trump is attacking a fundamental democratic right even though he does not have the power to revoke FCC licenses, and the FCC does not license individual networks, according to their website.

Trump repeatedly criticized the media while campaigning for president, and his attacks have only increased since taking office.

One of his most affecting comments came in February, when he declared the media an enemy.

How did it come to this?

The media has conducted itself as the fourth estate for centuries. Which means, ethically, it must act as an objective party that keeps checks and balances on the government by always reporting the truth, according to the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics.

According to the Constitution, the president and Congress has to take an oath of office before representing the country. It states they must support and defend everything in the Constitution. Which includes freedom of speech and freedom of the press.

Two promises.

Two separate entities, swearing to act on the public’s behalf.

So, who is following through?

A recent Reynolds Journalism Institute poll shows that about two-thirds of the public are either likely, or very likely to trust the mainstream media.

A CNN poll from August found that three-quarters of all Americans do not trust the majority of information that the White House releases.

Since Gallup began polling Americans, the highest rating of confidence  was in 1976 when 72 percent of Americans trusted the media. The public’s trust in the media has steadily declined since 2007, and it dropped heavily in 2015.

However, recent trends indicate that the public has begun to trust the media again, according to the Reynolds Journalism Institute poll.

The Pew Research Center says the highest rating of trust in government (from 1958 until 2017) was in 1964, when 77 percent of Americans reported that they could trust the federal government.

However, trust in government dipped under 20 percent during the Clinton and Obama administrations. Sudden peaks or valleys in these confidence ratings generally occur after a scandal or national event, such as Clinton’s impeachment and 9/11.

The public does not overwhelmingly trust the government or journalists, which should be a concern because the public is the most important audience for each of them.

What does Twitter think?

Both Trump and the media has critics and supporters when it comes to Twitter .

Regardless, the public is consistently going back and forth about whether the president, or the media, is justified.

Unfortunately, there does not seem to be an end in sight for the war between Trump and the media.

ESPN recently suspended one of its personalities, Jemele Hill, for tweeting about the NFL’s national anthem protest.

Trump targeted Hill. He tweeted about ESPN and the NFL dozens of times in response to the anthem protests and her tweets.

But, Hill has also previously criticized Trump.

The fighting continues, and the low jabs on both sides will probably not help matters.

Trump and the media have gone back and forth several times. Infographic by Katie Ebner.

Florida Focus News Brief March 8, 2017

In this news brief: local activists are raising awareness this International Women’s Day; a bird strike forces a United flight to return to Tampa International Airport; Tampa police are investigating the shooting of two teens; Hillsborough County strikes down the cap on local medical marijuana dispensaries.

 

 

 

Florida Focus News Brief March 2, 2017

In this news brief: Tampa Fire Rescue battles a three-alarm fire at a student housing complex; St. Petersburg Police are investigating a fatal shooting; a local-based grocery store is now selling locally roasted coffee; Mosaic expects to spend up to $70 million to fill a Polk County sinkhole; the Strawberry Festival opens today.

Florida Focus News Brief Feb. 23, 2017

In this news brief: home market tracker Zillow says Tampa has the nation’s third-fastest appreciating housing market; a man is arrested for swinging swords at a Brooksville Wal-Mart; Hillsborough’s Department of Health issues advisory warnings for two local beaches owing to the presence of enterococci bacteria; Publix, a Lakeland-based grocery chain, ranks third out of 100 companies for social responsibility and emotional appeal according to a national consumer survey; TripAdvisor ranks Clearwater beach number one in the nation and number 20 in the world.

 

Florida Focus News Brief Feb. 20, 2017

In this news brief: Deputies shot and killed a Hernando County man who broke into a home; a man is dead after a hit-and-run in Tampa; Pinellas County deputies have arrested a corrections officer for DUI; Body cam footage show a dramatic car rescue in Pasco County; the largest-ever traffic study ranks congestion in cities worldwide; the University of South Florida earns the 2016 Tree Campus USA.

Florida Focus News Brief Feb. 16, 2017

In this news brief: 11 year-old Jenna Irmler has Asperger’s Syndrome and was found 30 miles from her Brandon home today after reports that she was missing yesterday; a woman warned a burglar that she was armed, and shot him when he ignored her; Winn-Dixie is revamping their private label brands; Hillsborough County Sheriff’s office hosts “coffee with a cop” at a local McDonalds stay involved with the community.

Florida Focus News Brief Nov. 16, 2016

In this episode: a toddler is hospitalized after being shot, police believe it was accidental; the University of South Florida is warning students to stay alert after a student is robbed on campus; a 15 year-old is arrested in Manatee County for having marijuana stuffed down one sock, and meth stuffed down the other; Pasco County Fire Rescue is supplying and installing smoke detectors for those who need them; pig carcasses block northbound lanes on I-75.

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Florida Focus News Brief Nov. 10, 2016

In this episode: Devon Lee Freeman is in custody, charged with second-degree murder for fatally shooting a Bradenton teen; Clearwater police are searching for a serial armed robber, suspected of hitting two Wal-Mart stores as well as a Seven-Eleven; a Disaster Recovery Center opens in Manatee County to assist victims of Hurricane Matthew; new bike lanes are coming to down town Tampa; the Tampa Bay Lightning celebrate our veterans with camouflage warm-up jerseys, holiday cards from fans to troops overseas during the Lightning’s Military Night at Amalie Arena.

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Florida Focus Health Brief Oct. 28th, 2016

In this Florida Focus Health Brief: an experimental drug is showing great promise in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease; sitting for long periods of time can affect your health according to a recent science advisory; researchers are developing an edible battery; and Tampa Bay area’s first medical marijuana dispensary is now open.

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Florida Focus News Brief Oct. 11, 2016

In this episode: Florida voter registration has been extended; Bill Clinton comes to Safety Harbour tonight while Donald Trump plans to campaign in Lakeland tomorrow; Hurricane Matthew has caused 80 insurance claims in Bay area counties; clown costumes have been pulled from local Goodwill shelves; the Tampa Police Department pays tribute to Lois Marrero.

 

 

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Florida Focus News Brief Sep. 26, 2016

In this episode: an elderly woman is injured when a car crashes into her home; Governor Rick Scott issued a new emergency rule; care for transgender patients is being offered in southwest and central Florida; a pilot program is expanding streetcar services in Ybor and downtown Tampa; and red tide has been detected in bay area beaches.re

 

Florida Focus News Brief September 21, 2016

In this episode: Sewage problems spread across the Bay area following Hurricane Hermine; Clearwater Police participated in opioid overdose training; City officials released new details about a High-Speed Ferry service; The church of Scientology hosted a prayer party for International Day of Peace.

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Florida Focus News Brief April 13th, 2016

In this episode: surveillance video of suspected serial burglar released; high school student arrested for laced gummy worms; Allegiant Airlines adds two new St.Pete Clearwater airport routes; Dade City Police Department reveals safe space to exchange goods sold online; Amalie Arena pulls off quick turnaround for play-off game.

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