Rings Reflect Precious Memories for Graduates

The Sam and Martha Gibbons Alumni Center at USF was filled with love and well-wishes as students and their families gathered to celebrate their journey at USF at the fall 2016 official Ring Ceremony.

Students who have completed at least 75 credit hours toward their degree earned the opportunity to purchase a class ring. Giving them a chance to reflect not only on their academic accomplishments, but also their memories at USF.

“We had become bowl eligible and it was the first time we were bowl eligible since 2011,” said Joseph Couture, a USF student receiving his ring. “I saw the student population just jump off the stands and jump onto the field.”

The night’s festivities began as the Alumni Association’s Executive Director, Bill McCausland, greeted those in attendance. The Honors College Dean, Dr. Charles Adams also played a role in the ceremony as he presented each senior with their ring, which carries a special meaning for some in attendance.

“I had a high school graduation ring and it helped me remember all of the memories throughout high school,” said Pricella Morrison, another ring recipient. “I thought it would be great to commemorate all my achievements at USF here as well with a ring.”

Senior Kendyl Muehlenbein echoed that feeling.

“I really wanted to capture my USF experience in something that I could have for the rest of my life,” Muehlenbein said. “Other than just memories and a degree.”

Those memories are what students will carry with them as they dip their rings into the Alumni Center fountain to ensure success after they graduate, knowing that they always have a piece of their university on their hand.

 

The Truth Behind the USF Seal

The USF seal is a significant icon to USF history. It’s the first landmark you see on Collins, and in the middle of the Marshall Student center.

But what does it mean?

Jacob Stephenson, a freshman at USF, voices his opinion on the based on the myth he’s heard.

“Yea, I heard that if you step on it you won’t graduate. That’s a given. So pretty sure no one actually steps on it. I’ve seen people step on it, but I’m sure they’re not going to graduate,” Stephenson said.

Fahad Al Raee is also a freshman, and he heard the same rumor from advisors.

“They told me you should not step on the logo because if you do you will not be able to pass,” Raee said.

The Seal was created by Henry Gardner and was first used in the USF Catalog called Accent on Learning. But besides the myth going around campus about the seal, John S. Allen, the USF’s first president defined its meaning.

“President Allen, he knew a lot of the programs here were studying the earth, everything happening on the earth. He by trade was, by his academic background was an astronomer,” Andy Huse said, from Special Collections. “There’s the sun symbolizing knowledge, light, heat, life. The lamp symbolizes enlightenment. The Green corresponds with the Earth, and the Gold corresponds with the Sun.”