USF community retaliates against sexual misconduct on campus

In the wake of recent incidents on campus, USF committees are getting active in educating students on the dangers of sexual harassment.

According to the USF Police Department, two women were met by a stranger late at night on Nov. 4. They were approached on separate occasions within less than 30 minutes of each other. The situations escalated to inappropriate personal contact before the male suspect fled the scene.

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Phi Sigma Pi president works to improve education after graduation

Cristina VasquezThis Thanksgiving, Cristina Vasquez, president of USF’s Phi Sigma Pi, is thankful for school.

“There are times when I realize how lucky I am to go to college,” said Vasquez, reminiscing about her worry over attending a university. “I don’t want other students to have to miss out on an education because something is holding them back.”

Growing up in a military home, Vasquez was constantly moving between foreign bases like Italy, Japan and Germany, filled with interesting cities and people. Her diverse insight has provided her with a worldly perspective on life and the importance of education.

“There are different education systems around the world, but most are more accessible than schools in the [United] States,” said Vasquez. She has seen firsthand the issues that plague students in the Tampa Bay community who cannot afford to get an education because of socioeconomic problems.

Vasquez believes that part of the reason why students drop out of high school or do not continue on to college, is because they don’t receive proper counseling and instruction on how to apply to school and receive funding. She also believes that some of them do not realize the importance of school, early on.

“My mother worked a full-time job, raised three kids and sacrificed her free time to go to college. Without her, I never would have realized the importance of education. I wouldn’t have had the opportunities I have now.” Vasquez said.

Annie Hudgins, Vasquez’s mother, agrees that she was always trying to instill the importance of education into her children.

“I always told my children, I can’t leave you much but the one thing I want for you all is to get an education, because once you have that many doors that will open up for you. You [will] start to understand the world and others better,” she said.

Currently, Vasquez is a senior psychology student at USF. She hopes to become a high school counselor in the future, so that she may aid students into choosing to pursue higher education, despite the obstacles they may face. In the meantime, she uses her fraternity influence to run school supply and book drives for local elementary and middle schools.

“We have a philanthropic goal to overcome in the fraternity, and mine is education inequality. Every child deserves a good education,” said Vasquez. While the fraternity also participates in other charitable goals, like cleaning up the USF campus, Vasquez enjoys being able to pursue her passions with her fraternity.

Kiana Coffey, Vasquez’s best friend and roommate is also a member of Phi Sigma Pi and supports Vasquez’s passions in the fraternity.

“I think this is a really important goal. More accessible education would offer students facing adversity more opportunities for success,” Coffey said. She also believes that Vasquez’s loving nature and strong leadership skills would make her successful in pursuing this passion.

Vasquez may be an education advocate in the Tampa community, but at USF she makes strides elsewhere. Vazquez runs the first all gender-inclusive, honor fraternity at USF. Phi Sigma Pi consists of 40 to 60 people each semester, all of which have at least a 3.2 GPA and three or more semesters left at the university. According to Vasquez, Phi Sigma Pi has a hand in everything including scholarship, social and charity events.

Despite having the final say in fraternity decisions, Vasquez always takes into consideration the opinions of all her fraternity members.

“As a leader, it’s important to take the backseat and do what’s best for the group,” said Vasquez.

Patrick Bagge, a Phi Sigma Pi initiary advisor believes that Vasquez is a great mentor.

“[She] always puts the needs of others before her own,” Bagge said. “and always does her utmost to fulfill her goals.”

Cellular and Molecular Biology student, Kaylie Male, also agrees that Vasquez is an influential leader.

“I don’t think that [Vasquez] realizes how much positivity she radiates. I feel that her future will greet her with many more opportunities than she may even think possible. Her positivity and determination will be at the root of her success,” said Male, who has been a member of Phi Sigma Pi for two years.

Vasquez will be graduating USF in the spring of 2015. She hopes to inspire others to pursue higher schooling and become leaders within their community.

“Cristina will do a lot of good in the world, in small ways and big ways. She is definitely someone to keep an eye on,” Coffey said.

 

Former football captain blitzes into USF campus life, leads by example

For most students, college is about the impact it has on them. But for one junior at the University of South Florida, it’s the other way around.

Victor Cimino is a member of the USF Student Senate, newly elected president of the Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity and a programming director at the Center for Student Involvement. He uses all three platforms to help others and impact their lives.

With so many leadership roles on campus, Cimino likes to think of them as additional classes. He knows just how important it is to keep up with all of his positions, so he frequently check his emails but understands when its time to take a break and focus on homework. A typical day for him begins at 8 a.m. and he doesn’t get back to his apartment until 11 p.m.

Some of Cimino’s duties include: planning and managing the events for Homecoming Week and USF Week, leading his fraternity and making positive changes to their organization, and also fulfilling the expectations of the students who elected him to senate.

Despite his heavy involvement on campus, and the impact he has on student life at USF, Cimino doesn’t let it get to his head—especially since he wasn’t one to be interested in leadership positions prior to college.

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Skip the all-nighter, get some sleep

Roshni Patel and Keylon Moraldo are two complete strangers with one thing in common: Neither of them gets enough sleep.

Patel, a sophomore biomedical sciences major, is at the library almost every night during the school week. A typical day on campus for her begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 1 a.m., when she finally returns to her off-campus apartment.

“I probably get four to five hours of sleep on a normal night,” Patel said. “Some nights I get even less, and I feel really sleepy. Then I’m just dragging myself through the day, trying to figure out the next time I can hit my bed.”

Moraldo, a sophomore chemical engineering major, cites his heavy workload and roommate issues for his lack of sleep. He says that getting the ideal seven to eight hours of rest is impossible because he has so much to do and needs to get good grades.

“I don’t have a bedtime. I just basically nap for an hour or so— seriously, it’s what I do!” he said. “I know it’s not good, and I’m trying to readjust it in time for exams, so I can be well-rested for them.”

Patel and Moraldo are just two of the many college students nationwide who are sleep-deprived. Nearly 60 percent of college students claimed to feel “tired, dragged out, or sleepy” on multiple days during a normal week, according to a 2010 study of over 95,000 students by the American College Health Association. Brown University also reported that only 11 percent of college students get good sleep.

“Unfortunately, students don’t realize how much sleep deprivation affects their performance,” said Rachael Novick, a certified health education specialist at the USF Wellness Education center. “Health-wise, sleep can affect everything.”

Novick said that lack of sleep can cause students to feel more stressed leading to weight gain, a weakened immune system and problems learning and remembering material for class.

Dr. Robert Geck, the associate program director and a faculty physician at the USF Sleep Center, agreed.

“Inadequate sleep makes it difficult to consolidate your memories and to form new ones,” he said. “As a student, pulling an all-nighter actually impairs your memory more than getting a good night’s rest.”

Geck also pointed out that students run the risk of injuring themselves and others when they don’t get enough sleep. At a commuter school like USF, sleep-deprivation can cause grogginess and judgment problems in students driving to and from campus, resulting in car accidents.

But the bad news doesn’t stop there.

The amount of stress on a student’s body due to sleep deprivation could also have some serious consequences.

“Increased stress can lead to an increased disposition towards diabetes, heart disease and stroke farther down the road for students,” Geck said.

However, the good news is that it’s never too late for students to try and fix their sleeping habits.

“A lot of students don’t know what it feels like to be well-rested and productive because they never have been,” said Novick.

The Wellness Education center seeks to inform students on the importance of getting more sleep through data collection and programs on campus involving topics such as proper napping. Novick explained that naps shouldn’t make up for students’ lack of nighttime sleep, and they should only last 20 to 30 minutes. That amount of time allows students’ bodies to reach a restorative level of sleep, allowing them to wake up feeling energized.

“Sleep packs” are also available for free from the Wellness Education center. They include earplugs, an eye mask and “sleepy time” tea to help a student relax and get a good night’s rest.

Students may also be surprised that some of their daily habits can affect the quality of their sleep at night.

Geck recommended avoiding caffeinated drinks after 12 p.m. Beverages like coffee and soda only help to alleviate tired feelings for a short time, and can make it difficult to fall asleep at night. He explained that electronics, such as cell phones, tablets and TVs, should be turned off and kept away from the bed. The noises and light produced by these devices can disturb a student’s sleep throughout the night.

But the biggest change is probably the easiest to think of: setting a sleep schedule.

“Ideally, the key would be to keep a strict sleep regimen. Try to keep the same bedtime and wakeup time, if you can, regardless of the day of the week,” said Geck.

Like any problem, the first step to solving it is admitting you have one, and Patel and Moraldo aren’t in denial.

“I think if I didn’t feel like I have to do every single thing, I’d have more time to sleep,” said Moraldo. “I’m definitely going to spend a lot of time sleeping over winter break, and hopefully come back to school on a better schedule.”

Patel sees a few all-nighters in her future, and knows exactly how they will impact the average amount of sleep she gets.

“Oh, it’ll decrease, for sure,” she said. “I wish I got more sleep than I do.”

Unique Gifts For College Greeks

Phyllis Grae-Nielson has just finished celebrating the 27th anniversary of Greek Unique, her fraternity and sorority based store. Located near the University of South Florida in Tampa, Greek Unique also serves the University of Tampa, St. Leo University and Florida Southern University.

Greek Unique offers hundreds of gift items for almost every fraternity or sorority. However, they are best known for their classic jerseys and made-to-order items.

“We have a lot of different options, we have about 208 different fabrics so people can come in and choose the fabric that we have and they can also bring in their own fabric,” said Cali Sanford, the store manager.

What makes Greek Unique so special is that everything that is made to order, besides the garments, is made by hand. The fraternity and sorority letters that are sewn onto the jerseys are hand cut and put together.

“The main things that we do are double stitch and embroidery, so double stitch is the twill letters that you see that go across most of the people’s shirts and the embroidery is just standard embroidery,” said Sanford.

Greek Unique is also a family-based business. The store was first opened by Grae-Neilson and her two daughters, both USF Alumni. Now it is run by Grae-Neilson and her husband Alistar Nielson, who does the embroidery.

“This is what I’ve been doing for 27 years, and I love it,” said Grae-Nielson.

Greek Unique is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m.  to 6 p.m. and is located at 5025 East Fowler Avenue.

Wholloween Brings Whovian Swing to USF Marshall Center

In full swing, Doctor Who fans and swing dancers came out to dance the night away and participate in costume contests. Wholloween, an annual event at USF, was held Oct. 23 from 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. at the Marshall Student Center’s amphitheater. The event was open to everyone. Roughly a hundred people came out to the event. It was a mixed crowd of Doctor Who themed costumes, self-invented costumes, and non-costumed attendees.

2nd Annual Crescent Classic Chili Cook-Off raises funds, fun

On Sunday, October 26, the Eta Eta Chapter of Gamma Phi Beta hosted its 2nd Annual Crescent Classic Chili Cook-Off in Greek Village at USF. The proceeds from the entrance fee go to the charity Girls on the Run. Guests voted on their favorite chili and were invited to play cornhole and line dance. Winning organizations received trophies. The first place overall winner Sigma Nu.

Unique challenges, frenzied pace unite Greek chapters to ‘Run With the Bulls’

Story and photographs by: Emma Sims and Alyssa Perry

The men from USF’s Sigma Nu fraternity had a powdery layer of sawdust on their glasses. It was nearing midnight Wednesday. The clouds of fine dust battled for space in the already anxious air that filled the fraternity house backyard.

There were two days until the USF Homecoming parade, and the team of two Greek chapters, Sigma Nu and Delta Delta Delta, had just started building their float. They were behind schedule and running out of time. And to add more spice to the Crock-Pot of confusion, they did not have a theme for their float.

The team planed on decorating their trailer with a “Peter Pan” theme – at first.

“We have a problem. Gamma Phi Beta is already doing “Peter Pan” as their theme,” Delta’s activities director Nicole Harris said. “We can’t do it now, it’ll look like we copied them.”

“Maybe they copied us,” Sigma’s activity director John Lemmer said.

“We need a new theme, like now. Does anyone have an idea?” Harris asked the crew of six.

“What about “The Little Mermaid?’” Jill Bowen said.

The three Sigma Nu brothers were not impressed. Their childhood movie repertoire likely did not include the singing redheaded mermaid. The men wanted to stick with “Peter Pan,” but the women had already started singing Ariel’s ballad, “A Part of Your World.” The battle was lost as soon as it began.

“I’ve got gadgets and gizmos aplenty, I’ve got whozits and whatzits galore. You want thingamabobs? I’ve got 20. But who cares? No big deal. I want more,” the group of Deltas belted to their confused audience.

“OK stop. This isn’t “High School Musical,’” Jordan Moore said.

“We don’t have any more time to talk about it,” Lemmer said.

And so, “The Little Mermaid” it was.

USF’s 2014 homecoming theme was “Once Upon a Homecoming.” The campus celebrations culminated with the Running with the Bulls Night Parade Friday night, comprised of floats and participants from various organizations, including Greek teams. Floats were judged for first, second and third place. There were four categories in the judging criteria: originality and creativity, theme, design and construction and, of course, green and gold spirit. The deadline for float construction was 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10.

The Running with the Bulls Night Parade took place at 7 p.m. Friday. Professional and homemade floats participated in the contest. The winner would be announced later that night at the Homecoming After-Party.

Fraternities and sororities at USF paired up for the homecoming week events. Each Greek team had a committee of 20 participants, with 10 from each fraternal organization. The participating few were expected to take part in the homecoming responsibilities, which included building the float.

Float construction was not limited to the homecoming committee. Any of the organization’s members could help, but finding available students proved to be a project in itself.

“It’s really hard to find people who will help. It’s a really ridiculous time commitment for the week,” Harris said. “That’s hard when people have class at night and jobs.”

Wednesday night’s float crew included only six workers – three sorority sisters and three fraternity brothers. The Sigma men were working until 1 a.m. Thursday, building a pirate ship on their trailer.

“Girls can’t exactly handle power tools,” Harris said.

Once the float construction was assembled, the women joined the men to help improve the aesthetics. Friday afternoon was spent working collaboratively to meet the float competition’s criteria.

Harris was trying to round up the focus of her workers. She needed to make a trip to the Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Store for some last minute supplies.

They had three hours left.

“OK, so we need spray paint, plastic swords, candy, bubbles, fabric and hats. What else?” Harris said.

“Girls, who wants to be the Rose to my Jack?” Moore asked.

Harris rolled her eyes.

“This isn’t “Titanic”, Jordan. It’s “The Little Mermaid,” Harris said.

On the house’s back deck, Jack, Bowen’s four-month-old Golden Retriever, yelped and whined. Perhaps his distress stemmed from the cone of shame around his perky head (a result of his recent neutering procedure), or perhaps he was warning the students that they were running out of time.

Jack was politely ignored. The team was busy bantering about what to buy at the craft store.

“What about confetti poppers?” Lemmer asked.

“No,” Harris said. “We’re not doing that.”

“I’m the king of the world!” Medlin shouted from the pirate ship’s platform as he gripped the ship’s wheel.

It was going to be a long afternoon.

Homecoming week was packed with events.

Every day, except Wednesday, had a game in which the Greek teams were expected to compete. Various other events accompanied the games, including a weeklong blood drive, a soda can tab donation and the construction of a USF Spirit sculpture. These events were ongoing, and teams were given sign-in points for each event in which a member participated.

“It’s just kind of a lot,” Harris said.

Although the homecoming week consists largely of competitions, teams remain friendly with one another.

“It’s nothing dramatic,” elementary education major and Gamma Phi Beta sorority member Amanda Carlton said. “You get to bond with someone you wouldn’t normally work with.”

At the end of homecoming week, points were tallied and winners were announced. The categories included overall placement and individual competition placements.

“Sigma Nu is really good at intramurals,” finance major and Gamma Phi sister, Shelby Fouts-Harley said.

Lemmer said their team, The Fuzzy Wombats, spent around $450 on their “Little Mermaid” float, which was entirely homemade. Essential materials included large particleboards, gallons of green paint and fabric for decorations and costumes.

“We put a lot of work into it, so at this point we want to win,” Harris said. “It’d be awesome if we did, but it’s not the end of the world.”

The staging area on Holly Drive was buzzing with school spirit.

The gold dresses of the Sun Dolls sparkled in the setting sun as the Herd of Thunder band tapped on their snares. Professional floats boasted bright paint jobs, permanent props and loud music. The homemade floats were waiting next to their manufactured competitors. Everyone was gearing up to go.

The parade was in an hour.

The Wombat’s float was hooked up to the trailer-hitch on Bowen’s white Chevrolet truck. A Sigma Nu flag flapped proudly from a pipe on the ship’s bow. There were two fishnets draped on the sides of the 10-foot-tall trailer construction, named “The S.S. Fuzzy Wombats.”

The team’s creation met all the required competition criteria: it was original, it fit USF’s fairy tale theme, the construction was sturdy and it was decked out in all green and gold paint. There was only one component missing from the team’s float – the members of the Fuzzy Wombats. No one accompanied the float.

There was 15 minutes to show time.

The sidewalks on Holly and Maple Drive were peppered with an audience of students, alumni and everyone in-between.

The parade was rolling along the road covered in Laffy Taffy and cheap strings of beads. Children leapt for their lives to catch the flying treats.

The party music and cheers of “Go Bulls” filled the air with school spirit.

It was 8 p.m. and the parade was almost over.

Then, around the corner cruised “The Little Mermaid” crew. The Delta women and Sigma men were cheering and grinning.

“The S.S. Fuzzy Wombats” made it after all. Their float was not the best looking one, but it was there. And for that, they were proud.

USF Police Department keeping peace amongst the chaos at Homecoming

police image

 

Friday night of Homecoming week is probably the most hectic. There is so much going on all at once: the carnival is up and running, crowds line the streets to watch the parade and then file across Palm Drive to watch a concert. There is a line of cars trying to make it to the various parking lots and people are crossing the streets from all directions. From a by-stander’s point of view, it’s a recipe for disaster.

To handle this much chaos, the USF Police Department start preparing months ahead.

“We collaborate with various entities on campus in preparation for it,” Assistant Chief Chris Daniel said. “As the week approaches we start looking at staffing. We require all officers to be available.”

There are 52 officers on staff at USF, but during large events, such as Homecoming, the Temple Terrace Police Department steps in to offer additional resources.

While students, alumni and faculty are relaxing and enjoying the various events, some USF Police officers are riding around on bikes patrolling the campus grounds making sure attendants are staying safe.

The biggest issue of Homecoming is the concert. Because the concert is open to the public, people not affiliated with the university attend and this has caused some problems in the past.

“We don’t have control of access,” Daniel said. “There’s no checkpoints around the event. We just have to deal with what occurs instead of trying to prevent.”

And this year would be no different from past Homecomings. The university police had to remove a few people from the concert for disorderly conduct and there was one arrest.

“A student who took a fire extinguisher and discharged it throughout the crowd and then ran from police when we tried to catch him.” Daniel said

The university police have also had issues concerning the people who attend the parade. They run out in front of the floats to cross the street or to pick up the goodies that have been thrown.

“Often times the person driving the float can’t see that well and there’s always a risk of somebody getting hurt,” Daniel said.

To help with this problem the USF Police Department has officers riding on bikes alongside the floats, and officers, dressed in safety-green vests, standing in the intersection of Bull Run Drive and Alumni Drive directing cars, people and floats, making sure all get across the intersection safely.

University police officer Frank Wassenberg, who was riding a bike patrolling the campus Friday night, said so far everything has gone smoothly.

For many USF students Homecoming week is an exciting time. A time to relax and enjoy the array of festivities. But for USF’s Police Department it’s a time of working long hours and making sure all in attendance stay safe.

“Homecoming is a great event,” Daniel said. “It’s taxing on our resources, but it’s only one week out of the year that we’re in this position, so it’s very manageable.”

Cooking event to teach USF students how to balance crazy schedules and eating healthy

Cooking with the Dietitians is an event hosted at USF to help students learn about eating healthy. Tips are given to students, by registered dietitians, to find ways to choose a healthy lifestyle on the second week of every month.

Dividing your plate into fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy and protein is just one of the important topics in the presentation. Ashlea Kurmay, a USF student, attends these events and has learned the importance of cooking a healthy meal.

“Suffice for yourself by actually going to the grocery store and cooking an actual healthy meal and I think that this really helps teach students that,” Kurmay said.

Busy schedules and skipping a healthy meal are common among students in college.

However, Kurmay is proof that it’s not impossible to make small changes for a healthier lifestyle. She keeps an active schedule and stays away from drinks that have a great deal of one specific ingredient – sugar.

“I work about four to five times a week and I just try to eat really healthy and not drink like soda or anything with a lot of added sugar,” Kurmay said.

A vegetable like a bell pepper is recommended by Health Promotion Specialist Alex Kloehn, who works with USF’s Wellness Center. The vegetable usually does not get credit for its benefits because it is an uncommon ingredient for recipes.

Bell peppers have high levels of vitamins A and C and are a good source of fiber. Although they range in different colors, the red, orange, and yellow peppers carry more of these nutrients.

“Actually, a bell pepper has almost twice as much vitamin C as an orange.” Kloehn said. “So, it’s something that people don’t know. So, when you’re sick and you want to fight off that cold, try having a bell pepper instead of an orange.”

Kloehn is the head of the promotions department at the Wellness Center for any health presentation and can be available for a one on one discussion. The Student Health Services is also another option to find a professional dietitian and help you make a health plan.

“It would be great if people knew a little bit more about why fruits and vegetables are beneficial. And that’s one of our goals here with produce of the month,” Kloehn said.

The next event for Cooking with the Dietitians will be on October 8th.

USF Career Services Fair Connects Students with Job Opportunities

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAymM9nIVAM

USF Career Services hosted its Internship & Part-Time Job Fair Wednesday. The career fair, hosted at least once every semester, provides students with an opportunity to land internships or part-time jobs that could turn into full-time employment after graduation.

“I’m looking for either an internship or part-time job while I’m at school,” graduate student Susan Mendez said. “I already have a bachelor’s degree in philosophy, and I’m here to take prerequisite courses to be eligible for a master’s in economics.”

Susan was among the 350 students in attendance looking to change their post graduation luck.

But what student qualities are of interest to employers at the career fair?

“What we are looking for in a student is that leadership quality,” Target Sr. Field Campus Recruiter Grace Blankenship said. “So being able to work with the team and to lead others and also to drive for results.”

While every employer may look for specific qualities or abilities, the 22 employers at Wednesday’s event were hoping to offer internships and part-time positions to USF students.

“So I only found two, actually three, that I was actually interested in,” said Mendez. “I talked to Target and USF HR, but Tampa Bay Lighting – there wasn’t a spoke person there. So I didn’t get to talk to them.”

Mendez said her next step was to apply and talk with those in different departments, to see what they are looking for.

For a list of future USF career fairs, including the upcoming spring session, visit: www.usf.edu/career-services.

Convenience store binds community

The building is small, the parking lot only dimly lit and no neon sign indicating whether it is open or closed. But Bull Market has become a fixture in this area, a rare common experience for all college students and the families who live along 42nd Street.

It’s a stop-and-go place and there is a constant stream of people walking in, grabbing what they need and walking out. There are regular customers and transient types coming in as a last resort, as well as people using the parking lot as a meet-up spot for carpools or cab rides. And while there isn’t much tying these people together aside from the street they live on, Bull Market gives the neighborhood on 42nd Street a shared space where they can finally feel like neighbors.

Inside there are only five aisles, but it has almost every amenity needed: snack foods, cleaning supplies, toiletries and limited grocery items. Nazia Hirani is a sophomore, a USF transfer student from Georgia, and she likes how close the store is.

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A quiet encounter with Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall hugs a grade-school student before giving an impromptu speech to the children participating in Roots and Shoots, a community action and learning program, at the USF Botanical Gardens. “Young people can do an awful lot if you know what the problems are,” Goodall said. The primatologist asked the student audience to raise their hands if they wanted to help animals, other people and the environment. Almost all students raised their hands wildly. (Photo by Paige Butterfield)