USF’s annual career fair looks to bring career opportunities for students

Nearly 3,000 USF students flocked to the Marshall Student Center Ballroom last week for the annual USF Career Fair.

Students from all different majors were able to speak with hundreds of employers across the four different fairs held throughout the week. They were able to discuss future internship and employment opportunities in their chosen career fields.

“I’m excited about Career Fair because it’s a great opportunity to make connections and kind of get my foot in the door at the start of my career,” USF accounting major, Mitchel Geron, said.

The fair has been held twice a year, one in each fall and spring semester, for over 20 years on USF campus. This fair has given many students the platforms they need to learn the opportunities they have with the degree they will earn.

“Many of these interactions will lead to full-time job interviews, internship interviews, and summer employment opportunities,” Assistant Vice President of USF Career Services, Russ Coughenour, said.

USF Career Services will return with another career fair in the fall of 2016 with more employers and opportunities for students to network with major organizations.

Coughenour finished by stating, “These fairs get USF students the valuable out of classroom experience that they so desperately need so each year Career Services is very proud to bring Career Week to USF students.”

Author James Morrow gives lecture at USF

On Monday, March 21, 2016 renowned science fiction author, James Morrow, will be visiting USF to discuss his new novel, “Galapagos Regained”.

Morrow will be giving a lecture on the fourth floor of USF’s library at 6:00 p.m. where he will discuss issues of science, religion, and pop culture. Joining Morrow will be fellow science fiction author and USF professor, Rick Wilbur.

“I’ve been in the science fiction community for a long time,” said Wilbur. “Getting Morrow to do this lecture was as easy as some scheduling and making phone calls to a comrade.”

After a small amount of aligning schedules between Wilbur, the university, and Morrow, the author is set to discuss his latest novel as a part of USF’s humanities institute’s lecture series.

“I urge all students who can make it to attend Morrow’s lecture,” said Wilbur. “He’s an incredible author and this is a great opportunity to discuss contemporary issues with a knowledgeable professional.”

Morrow, a self-proclaimed scientific humanist, is an author famous for his unconventional historical novels, which often examine the intertwining concepts of religion and science. His latest novel, “Galapagos Regained” plot centers on a Victorian adventurer who decides to repeat the voyages of Charles Darwin.

Anyone, whether a student, faculty or community member, will be able to attend both Morrow’s lecture and the event’s reception and book signing free of cost.

Education Abroad makes international study a reality for USF students

Study abroad is an experience that few students are taking advantage of. Approximately 10 percent of undergraduates in the United States study abroad, according to the Institute of International Education.

“It’s such an amazing opportunity that so many students bypass just because of so many common myths like it’s expensive, or it’s not for me, or it’s not for my major,” Chris Haynes, student program coordinator for USF Education Abroad, said. “I feel like if they can come in and talk with me or talk with some of our GloBull Ambassadors who have been there and done that, we can really make this experience a reality. They also see the value in it.”

Education Abroad is working to improve the number of students who study abroad. They have teamed up with USF Career Services to inform people about the benefits.

“For an employer standpoint, we generally look for the whole person,” USF career consultant Doug Meyn said. “Yes, they may have had an internship, yes they may have had study abroad, but more importantly, what do those experiences mean? In other words, on a resume, I don’t like to just see, ‘I did this study abroad.’ OK, what did that mean to you? What did you learn from it? How does that make you a more well-rounded person?”

USF offers a wide variety of programs for its students, with over 100 Education Abroad trips in over 25 countries. Each program’s itinerary has a mix of scheduled activity and free time to explore. The aim is for students to be able to take away a unique cultural experience.

“The whole point is to get students onto the next level, whether that be in their professional careers or in graduate school,” Haynes said. “Study abroad is really a great stepping stone to make their resumes and their applications as competitive as possible. I think that’s something that I hope one day all students consider.”

Schoenfeld relieves with running

Running between the crowds of cheering families and friends at Epcot, Steven Schoenfeld kicked it into high gear as he approached the finish line, completing his second marathon this past January.

Schoenfeld, a sophomore at the University of South Florida, ran track competitively throughout high school, but was forced to stop before beginning college due to a minor knee injury which restricted his abilities.

With a desire to keep running, despite no longer competing, Schoenfeld signed up for a marathon and began to train himself.

“When I realized I couldn’t compete anymore, I just knew I had to do something that would keep me running,” said Schoenfeld. “Training for marathons gives me a reason to keep going and just makes me feel more connected to running.”

The marathon that Schoenfeld trains for is the Walt Disney World Marathon which is held every January. During this marathon, participants run 26.2 miles through all four Disney parks.

“I’ve been going to Disney all my life, so it’s awesome doing what I love at the parks I grew up going to,” said Schoenfeld. “It’s motivating seeing the different Disney characters cheering you on throughout the marathon.”

On top of training for marathons, Schoenfeld is an electrical engineering major at USF who is dedicated to his studies. He is also actively involved in band and Phi Mu Alpha, a social music fraternity.

“Ever since I can remember, I have been extremely involved in school,” said Schoenfeld.

Being involved in so many different activities and having a rigorous major tends to leave Schoenfeld feeling extremely stressed. Running is what Schoenfeld uses to disconnect from the strenuous lifestyle of academics and student life.

“There are days where I just know that I’ll be spending my night studying at the library,” said Schoenfeld. “I turn to running for stress relief because when I run, all I think about is the road ahead of me and not about any of my problems.”

When training for marathons, it is extremely crucial to have the support of both family and friends. Keegan Wertz, Schoenfeld’s little brother in Phi Mu Alpha, was extremely supportive during the training process and stood by to cheer Shcoenfeld during the marathon.

“I woke up at an ungodly hour of the morning to see Steven off on the day of his marathon and provide him with emotional support,” said Wertz. “I was also there to cheer him on from the sidelines as he crossed the finish line at Epcot. I couldn’t have been happier for him because I knew it was something he had been training and working extremely hard for.”

Schoenfeld also receives praise and respect for how well he manages to balance training, studying and staying involved.

His roommate, Justin Mouriz, has watched him grow as a person since he began college and admires his work ethic.

“The amount of work that Steven has put in for his marathons is unbelievable,” said Mouriz. “I can remember several days that he ran over 13 miles to keep his endurance up, and then took part in several activities for different organizations afterwards. All in all, Steven puts in a lot of work into all he does.”

School may be getting more rigorous and time consuming for Schoenfeld, but that is not stopping him from training for his next marathon in January 2017.

“It gets really hard to manage my time between training for a marathon and keeping up with school,” said Schoenfeld. “None of the struggles I go through before the marathon matter once I cross that finish line. It truly is the best feeling in the world.”

With the continued support of his friends and family, Schoenfeld eventually plans on running in a, iron man triathlon which consists of biking, swimming and running.

“Staying active is extremely important to me and I am always thinking of ways to challenge myself,” said Schoenfeld. “An iron man triathlon sounds like the ultimate challenge and I cannot wait to take that on.”

Getting social with the USF brand

Social media has never been more prevalent in college and professional sports than it is today. At the University of South Florida, Mike Farrell is the man behind the computer screen.

“A lot of it is one, developing a voice for our social channels and then two creating content that’s going to engage our fanbase,” Farrell said.

As the Director of Digital Content, Farrell is in charge of churning out vines, tweets, pictures and more across all of USF Athletics’ social media platforms every day.

“One of the things we want to do and want to push is to create stuff that is engaging, stuff that people want to consume, share, retweet and help spread the brand,” Farrell said.

One of the most important days for any athletic department each year is National Signing Day. Student athletes from all over the country officially sign with the school of their choosing. The content created by Farrell and his team made waves on a national level, including an appearance on Yahoo! Sports Dr. Saturday blog.

“This year in particular we had a couple national organizations, blogs, write about some of the things that we did,” Farrell said. “It was a lot of hard work, a lot of people put in a lot, a lot of hours for what’s really just a glorified morning. But I do think that it pays dividends in the end.”

The work Farrell puts in on a daily basis is critical to the growing online presence that is USF Athletics.

“For a large subset of our fans, if you don’t have that presence, you’re irrelevant,” Senior Associate Director of Athletics Andrew Goodrich said.

Even though Farrell is fully focused on the day-to-day task of enhancing USF Athletics’ presence online, he doesn’t lose sight of the big picture.

“When one person leaves, somebody else can come in and there’s no drop,” Farrell said. “That’s the USF brand. That’s the USF Athletics brand. That’s the USF football brand. There’s no change. That needs to be a constant.”

 

 

 

Study abroad but explore locally

This generation of “millennials” has a newfound urge to travel around the world. Wanderlust has been redefined and University of South Florida students have multiple opportunities to study abroad.

Dr. Rick Wilber, a mass communications professor, has been taking students to Ireland for the past two to three decades.

“There are a lot of wonderful places to go and a lot of great people to meet,” Wilber said. “It’s not surprising that this generation of students is taking advantage of the opportunity.”

The trip originally started off as backpacking through Scotland. But over the course of three to four years, Wilber says they started to spend more and more time in Ireland and less time in Scotland that it became the Ireland trip.

The new generation has many aspirations to travel the world but often forgets that there are many wonders in the great state of Florida. Stacie Aviles, a graduate student from USF, has become accustomed to taking any adventure she can fit into her busy schedule.

“I don’t think Florida gets a lot of credit for its nature,” Aviles said. “Lettuce Lake Park and Flatwoods Park are just two of many places students can go within a 10 minute drive.”

If there is one thing that Aviles wants her fellow millennials to remember, it is to steer away from the social media realm.

“Don’t spend so much time on your phones when you’re up there.” she said. “I know the views can be really breathtaking but just remember to take it all in for yourself.”

Education abroad, not so foreign anymore

The University of South Florida is more globally connected than ever before. This year, USF Education Abroad ushered in over a thousand international students. With 25 programs to choose from, more and more USF students are going overseas.

“We have grown in our diversity of programs and our diversity of students in participation, and we have also just simply grown in number of students we’re sending,” said James Pulos, the Associate Director of Education Abroad.

The Education Abroad office was not always the big program that it is today. Before the 1980’s, international programs were singularly organized by professors and staff. Over the decades, the independent programs unified to become what is known today as Education Abroad. Prior to this, the office was called Study Abroad. Before that it was International Programs, and earlier Travel Study.

Today, USF is sending and receiving students from all over the globe. This semester there are students from universities in England, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Japan, and Spain.

International students choose USF for multiple reasons.

Danish exchange student, Aske H. Muller chose USF for the weather and academics. “I wanted to live in a warm place, and a nice climate so I looked up Florida and California. Actually, USF was my first priority. I didn’t know it before I started looking into it, but it just seemed like a cool university.”

The exchange experience is different for each student, but the ultimate reward is creating global citizens within USF.

“Watching a student return from that and say, in the most positive and life-changing way” Pulos said, in regards to his favorite part of working with Education Abroad. “I have been changed and transformed, and I will carry this experience with me not for the remainder of the summer, not for five years, but for the rest of my life.”

USF St. Pete celebrates 50 years of learning

St. Petersburg, Fla – It’s a semicentennial celebration and the proud colors are green and gold.  USF St. Pete campus is celebrating its 50th year of operation in 2015.

The campus kicked off the year’s celebration in June with a ceremony and street renaming. Those who attended the event included USF President Judy Genshaft, Regional Chancellor of USFSP Sophia Wisniewska, Mayor Rick Kriseman, students and alumni.

“It marks 50 years of extraordinary students, brilliant faculty and dedicated staff.” said Sudsy Tschiderer,  USF St. Petersburg Alumna. “It’s about our students that are here now and up to 50 years ago.”

The school campus has a rich history that lies with the students and the buildings on campus. The campus features three main colleges. The College of Education, College of Arts and Sciences and the Kate Tiedemann College of Business, which is currently being built.

Student life has grown over the years of the university’s operation. When first opened in 1965, the school welcomed 260 students bused in from local cities. The student body population has expanded to an average of 6,000 students per semester. Even with the expansion, USF St. Petersburg has a vast size difference compared to the Tampa campus.

“I love that the class sizes are a little bit smaller so the teachers are into their students.” said Nicole Ward, a USFSP student. “It’s definitely a more intimate setting that I need in a class.”

Through the remainder of the year USFSP will host several events and seminars reflecting on the anniversary.

“Since I’ve been at this campus there are so many things that I love and I’m so glad I’m here to participate in this special year.” said Tschiderer.

For more information on upcoming anniversary events and celebrations visit USFSP.org/50years

 

 

Ms. USF, Phyllis P. Marshall

Tampa, Fla. – Phyllis P. Marshall is the backbone of the University of South Florida. She was there from the very beginning in 1960.

Marshall lived in the first student union called the University Center. She was essentially the first resident assistant on campus. The girls’ dorms were on the fourth floor of the building.

President John Allen wanted the focus of the school to be on academics and merits, not any social aspects.

“He and the other deans and the other students did not want beauty contests, popularity contests  and they didn’t want Greek organizations either,” Andrew Huse, associate librarian at USF said.

Huse said Marshall was an advocate for students. “If she didn’t go to the event, they might not have been able to have the event.”

Marshall is known as “Ms. USF” for her involvement with students. Among many ideas, she helped advocate for students to bank at the credit union. In her mind, it was not fair for students that did not have transportation.

“I think she was an advocate for integrating students with the university.” Huse said.

The University Center was later named the Marshall Student Center in 1994 to coincide with Marshall’s retirement.

More Than Meets the Eye At Office of Orientation

The University of South Florida’s Office of Orientation has a reputation around campus for being peppy tour guides.

While this isn’t a bad reputation to have, it also isn’t what they truly stand for.

If you visit this office on campus you’ll find that the students who work there care a lot more about the university and its students than you think.

Office of Orientation office staff member and former Orientation Team Leader, Brooke Aronow, loves the feeling of giving back.

“I love orientation because it gives me the opportunity to talk to students and make them feel comfortable about coming to USF. I love being able to be an input and give them guidance on this transition.”

The office has been around for about 20 years now and each year, they are working to improve their programs. Right now, their office consists of office staff workers, orientation leaders, family leaders and transition mentors, each playing a key role in the orientation process.

In previous years, the school handled orientation differently but since this office came to be, students have been able to feel better prepared for the next four years of their lives.

The two programs that are now offered through the office are First Year programs and Transfer programs, each catering to a different student population.

Each year, the senior staff works to develop more innovative programs and ways to keep the students engaged.

It is safe to say that this office is the first point of contact for many students, and without them, the USF experience might be very different.

 

A rising club at USF: Eudaimonia

Eudaimonia is a new and rising club at USF giving out free hugs to all who want one every Nov.14.

Jonathon Burroughs, the founder of Eudaimonia, began the club to commemorate a friend who committed suicide on the same day four years ago.

“I started this doing this to commemorate my friend who lost his life to suicide,” Burroughs said. “I do this for him, but some of the other members do it to just spread joy.”

Burroughs started giving out free hugs without the University’s approval, but soon got the go-ahead to continue when he received positive feedback from students.

“Sometimes you do things and you perpetuate events, and you don’t see the results,” Burroughs said. “But the results are there and it’s powerful. For me, it is about believing in the idea that what I’m doing has results that are powerful, even though I don’t see them.”

Hard work pays off for USF researcher

Emmanuel Smith did not plan to become a postdoctoral researcher at the University of South Florida (USF) during his undergraduate years. It took him four years to finish a two-year degree.

For fun, Smith asks people to guess his GPA when he was in college.

“I always tell them that it was extremely low and I tell them to shoot for as low as they can,” he said. “They always tend to put two extra points on top. My GPA after two years of community college was 0.69.”

When he was 22 years old, he said he had no idea what he wanted in life.

“Going out and drinking every night tends to be repetitive,” Smith said. “At the moment you might think you are having the best time of your life, but after you do it a bunch of times, you realize the experience doesn’t change. It’s just the same experience over and over again.”

Thanks to an undergraduate teacher, Smith pursued biochemistry and decided to go back to school, where he graduated with a 3.9 GPA.

“I wanted to feel good about what I was doing, so that led me going back to school and trying really hard,” Smith said. “It felt really good succeeding in my classes, and eventually that led to the path that decided to be a biologist.”

Colleagues at the USF lab said Smith is a hard worker and always motivates the team.

“Just his love of science, just the love of doing what he does, you can tell that he is passionate about the work that’s done here,” Derek Nichols said. “And, the work that he is looking forward to doing in the future.”

Emmanuel Smith surpassed his own expectations. He tells students if you want to succeed, you need to work hard now.

USF School of Music Student is Nominated for GRAMMY Award

Jose Ruiz may seem like your average student at the University of South Florida, but it turns out, there is a little more behind the music major than meets the eye.

“He is actually the first student from USF to be nominated for any sort of GRAMMY,” Dr. McCormick, a USF professor who has worked with Ruiz for over 20 years, said.

At just 28-years-old, Ruiz has been nominated to win a Latin GRAMMY in the category of Best Latin Jazz Album.

“I first met Jose when he was 8. He was in the third grade. He’s always been very diversified in his musical interests,” McCormick said.

“Going in this project, it was never about me. I wanted to be inclusive and invite my students as well and even my dad, my dad who has been there for me this whole time. He’s nominated now because he was one of the producers, you know, of the album,” Ruiz said.

Jose earned his Bachelors in Music Studies at USF. After travelling to the University of Miami for his Master’s Degree, he returned to USF to teach students while also earning his Ph.D. in Music Education.

“Dr. McCormick, that’s her name. She’s responsible for teaching me how to be an expressive player through an instrument,” Ruiz said. “And my father is responsible for cultivating my innate ability to adapt to different musical settings and to improvise and to pick things up by ear.”

The 2015 Latin GRAMMY’S will be held this November in Las Vegas.

 

USF professors awarded grant to launch education app

TAMPA, Fl.- Two University of South Florida professors in the college of education are working together as husband and wife to develop a new app that will allow young children in grades K-5 to access primary resources, or firsthand accounts of events and experiences throughout history.

Michael Berson, professor of social science education and advisor for Muzzy Lane Software, and his wife, Ilene Berson, professor of early childhood in the department of childhood education and literacy studies, are working with Muzzy Lane Software and a team of people throughout the country on the “KidCitizen” project. In September, “KidCitizen” was one of three educational app development grants given by the Library of Congress. The grant is approximately $320,000.

This project isn’t the first time that the Bersons have teamed up.

“We have been working for a very long time, since we were undergraduate students in college” said Michael Berson.

He said that they have a good working relationship, citing her “thoughtful approach to the exploration of curriculum” and her “unique perspectives on the project.” While he is excited to work with his wife, he is just as excited to work with the rest of the team. All were handpicked to be part of the project.

“It is truly a national treasure and to be working with them to create next generations of learning tools, it is a very big honor for us here at the college of education,” Berson said.

The team will be identifying developmentally appropriate primary resources for young children through photos, journal entries, news articles and other resources the Library of Congress has to offer. The focus of the project is on teaching young children about Congress and civics.

“We know, historically speaking, from research in our field that children don’t learn when they simply peruse a text,” Berson said. “They have to engage in content and look and explore and get dirty and dig deep when they’re dealing with history, because for a lot of kids they look at history and they say well that happened a long time ago, that has nothing to do with me.”

Daryl Saunders, social studies supervisor and generalist for area IV schools in Hillsborough County, specializes in implementation of standards, curriculum and development. She will be making sure that the final product can fit in with the curriculum, in the Florida state standards.

“We want more variety of resources and we want to find ways to get more complex resources in the hands of kids in a meaningful way,” Saunders said.

Most children have a phone or some type of device. Rather than shunning the use of the device completely, a ramification of education is occurring.

“What we hope to do is connect children through images to learn about congress to learn about civics, you know, what can they do in their community, by looking at the past and connecting it to their present day lives,” Berson said.

Berson hopes that the app is something that is easily accessible for students and teachers. While it will be free, that doesn’t always mean that people will use or be aware of it. The team will be working no only on design and content but also on how they can make accessibility a reality.

“Kids change, society changes and we have to change,” Saunders said.

Public-private partnerships on the rise at Florida universities

More college campuses in the state of Florida have started to form public-private partnerships, to build a maintain residence halls and other facilities on campus.

This is a result of a bill signed by Gov. Rick Scott in 2013. Scott signed the bill to allow public entities such as counties, school boards and universities to enter partnerships with private companies to build facilities “used predominately for a public purpose,”

These public-private partnerships (P3s) allow universities to pass off the responsibility of construction and management of facilities to a private company that specializes in those areas.

“With the right partner, a university gets to transfer risk off to the partner,” Anthony Barbar, chairman of the Board of Governors at Florida Atlantic University and President and CEO of Barbar & Associates, LLC, a real estate consulting firm, said. “[The private partner] is responsible for maintaining the buildings, they handle marketing, it helps the real estate project run more efficiently.”

Other Florida universities have already used P3s to build on-campus housing, parking lots and retail shops. Florida Atlantic University completed Phase I of its Innovation Village Apartments in fall 2011 through a partnership with Balfour Beatty Campus Solutions and Capstone Development. This project resulted in more than 1,200 new beds on campus. Phase II is expected to begin in 2015, and is to include an additional 1,200 beds.

At Florida International University’s Biscayne Bay campus, construction of Bayview Student Living is underway to add an additional 400 beds. It is expected to open in fall 2016 through a partnership with Servitas property management and construction services.

“They used to have an old 1960s building with maintenance problems and old systems,” Angel Rivera, Director of Development at Servitas said, “Now they’re going to have cutting edge student housing with modern technology that really fits modern students.”

USF plans to use a P3 to construct the new Andros Village, which will replace the current but outdated Andros residence halls on campus. Although the plans are not finalized, the village will be a partnership with Capstone Development Partners and Harrison Street Real Estate Capital. The first phase of the project is expected to be completed by fall 2017.

The proposed on-campus Publix supermarket that would be built near the Andros complex would be a P3 as well.

Improving student life on campus seems to be the central focus of the P3 projects at universities. Barbar believes that focusing on students’ on-campus housing experience and being able to provide them a space to adequately prepare academically for the workforce is the main goal of P3s.

“The aim of new housing is less resort-style and more being sensitive to students’ needs and wants. In the past we were oblivious to what students wanted, it was just, ‘this is what we have’,” Barbar said, “Now it factors into decisions of where students choose to attend.”

Rivera also says using P3s for dorm buildings positively impacts student life.

“Students get cutting edge student housing. They get the right areas they need for studying, they get areas for entertainment. And they should have areas for that. This is their home,” Rivera said, “And rent will be more affordable than it would be to live off campus in Miami.”

Public-private partnerships are becoming more commonplace at universities across the state and the country. New ideas to improve student life are what push the innovation of these P3 systems forward.

“If you pick the right partner and have the right practice, it works out great for the student, the university and the private company,” Barbar said, “It’s just the beginning and as a system we’re still trying to figure out what it means for the future.”

USFSP Professors Dig Up an Ancient Discovery

Digging for new discoveries is one of the most important aspects of archaeology. Sometimes you might not even know what you are looking for, but you might be surprised by what you find.

Doctors John and Kathy Arthur,  anthropology professors at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, know this exact feeling. During a cave excavation in Mota, Ethiopia, the Arthurs and their team discovered a human skeleton. Their findings were published in the journal Science and the Tampa Bay Times.

What makes this discovery significant is that the DNA of the individual contains the first complete ancient African genome.

“In the past, the few African specimens they had before they could only reconstruct part of the genome. This is the entire thing,” Dr. Kathy Arthur said.

A genome is the complete DNA sequence of an organism. This discovery will shed some light on the early interactions of ancient Africans and Eurasians, and the ways in which they lived.

The Arthurs named the individual “Bayira” which means “first born” in the Gamo language. Geneticists from the University of Cambridge determined that the individual dated back 4,500 years. They said he was about 5-foot-tall and lived to be about 50 years old.

The Arthurs plan on continuing their research on the Gamo people. They hope to be back in Ethiopia by 2017.

“They say we want the world to know our history, we want our nation to know and we want our children to know too. We want to pass this on to our children,” Dr. Kathy said.

 

 

 

App rewards students for paying attention

By Hayley Phillips

 

TAMPA—

 

A recent app, Pocket Points, rewards students for paying attention in class.

Launched in 2012 by creator Mitch Gardner, Pocket Points is now sweeping college campuses. When activated, the app counts the minutes a student does not utilize any other features on their phone. The points accumulated can then be used for discounts at local businesses.

“You can lock your phone, and it’ll start counting points. So as you start counting points, the more discounts you earn,” Jordan Loren, the University of South Florida Pocket Points ambassador, said.

Here’s the catch. You must be in class to earn points.

“The geo-fence . . . goes off wifi, so it’s set up from all of the hospital buildings, including all the academic buildings, MSC, and ROTC and the Rec Center as well,” Loren said. In other words, the only way to reap the benefits of the app is to pay attention in the classroom. USF student Tyler Moss says he does not mind putting his phone away for the greater good.

“I think the app is great . . . It really incentifies students to stay in class and uh, focus and you know, earn little rewards for doing so,” Moss said.

Loren says her favorite reward is the buy one get one free salad at So Fresh.

“I mean buy one get ones are great anywhere, and I love So Fresh,” Loren said.

Other local businesses who participate in the Pocket Points reward program include: Smoothie King, Are Pita, Graffiti Junktion, Cazador Grill, Total Nutrition, Babylon Hookah Lounge, Vitamin Discount Center and Planet Beach. Students also have the option to redeem points via online shopping at stores such as The Cabana Shop, COAST Apparel, ForELyse.com and many others.

Anyone can download the app for free today at the App Store for iPhones and Google Play for Android users.

 

 

USF implements reading days to help relieve stress of finals 

 

TAMPA, Fla.- The University of South Florida’s academic calendar has some changes that will help students during the most stressful time of the year, finals week.

When USF students were asked if they knew what reading days are, most were unaware of the calendar change.

“I do not know what reading days are,” said Erica Exalien.

“Kind of, I’ve heard about it but I’m not totally sure,” said Cole Nixon.

The spring 2016 semester will accommodate for two reading days on Thursday, April 28 and Friday, April 29. There will be no assignments due, tests given or even class on these days.

“Reading days are a period between the semester and the beginning of finals… so traditionally it’s used for students to prepare for finals,” said Student Body President Andy Rodriguez. “The amount of time varies depending on the school so some schools do one day, some schools do two days, some schools do three days, and there’s also schools that do an entire week off from school to prepare for finals.”

Other Florida universities have also implemented these reading days for spring 2016. This includes the University of Central Florida with one day, the University of Florida with two and the University of North Florida with three. Positive feedback is being heard around the state.

“It will give students an opportunity to be a little less stressed out when trying to prepare for one of the most stressful times of the year,” Rodriguez said. “Finals is when you will see students not eating, not sleeping or their hygiene is lacking because they need to get ready for what a bulk of their grade is going to be.”

From humbling beginnings to a bustling university

Just about everything great has humble beginnings. The University of South Florida is no different. When USF opened in the fall of 1960, it only had three buildings – the Administration building, the University Center and the Chemistry building.

The University Center doubled as a dorm for women back then but has since been torn down, the Marshall Student center now takes its place. MSC is now a central gathering location for all students on campus. According to USF student Kaysha Alvarez, ”MSC is a great meeting place for all people on a campus as large and diverse as our own.”

At the time, the Chemistry building housed all departments. Interesting enough, you can teach any subject in a chemistry building but you can only teach chemistry in a chemistry building.

Unlike UF and FSU, USF was the first state university built in an area that was already a bustling city, completely different from Tallahassee or Gainesville. “When I came here 27 years ago, this campus was a desert, not a University,” Gerry G. Meisels, Professor of Chemistry and Director, says. When the University began, all the land that is now home to the USF buildings, was barren and blowing sand was a huge problem.

The University started with 900 students and today the system serves 36,000. USF not only had students full of pride, we were also the first school in the state with air conditioned buildings.

Taste of Honey event ensures sweet time for all

The sixth annual Taste of Honey was held at the USF’s botanical gardens today. Over a hundred different varieties of honeys were available to taste test. Kim Hutton, USF’s botanical gardens program coordinator, thinks it’s really nice that students and staff bring home honey from their travels.

“We have some students that went to Africa and different spots and they remember us and come back.” explained Hutton.

Along with the cost of admission, gift baskets were raffled to raise money. The event raises money for the botanical gardens’ beekeeping club. There is no specific goal, but costs of maintaining the program can be expensive.

The club meets once a month starting in November for a year. Lessons include basic beekeeping instruction and hands on experience with honey bees. The students become certified beekeepers when they graduate from the program. Hutton says the beekeeping program is their way of serving the community. Beekeepers will remove bees from your home free of charge.

According to Hutton, Hillsborough County has the most certified beekeepers in the state of Florida. Brent Weisman, Florida master beekeeper, is the instructor of the beekeeping program. The ideal goal for him is to have a barn and instructional pavilion where school groups can learn about bees. Weisman hopes the general public could learn and understand more about bees.

“They are beneficial for human life, they have evolved over millions of years, they are not dangerous, and they are not aggressive.” he says.