Poetry highlight of USF German Day

This year’s German Day theme was “25 Years of German Unity.” The event was held on Oct. 23rd and was sponsored by the German Embassy in D.C.  The German Section at USF and the German Culture Club presented the event, which consisted of a poetry slam and a poster contest. There were also free refreshments, raffle prizes and other items given away. 

Local Artists Showcase Talent at Don’t Stop St. Petersburg

Don’t Stop St. Petersburg just came back for the event’s third year in the Arts District of downtown. Over 40 local and regional musicians came out to play on the streets showcasing some of the raw talent this city holds.

The event was crowded with people checking out all of the musicians, artists and other vendors that volunteered for the event. There was a wide variety of art styles and food, representing the artistic diversity in St. Pete. The event served as a great venue for bringing the community together for the day.

Several successful bands such as Underoath and Sleepwave have come out of St. Pete, and events like this are a great way for local musicians to get noticed and supported. The same thing goes for the other vendors that are hoping to grow their businesses.

Don’t Stop St. Petersburg was a great success, and there is no doubt that we will be seeing it come back again next year.

Students Escape Stress at USF Botanical Gardens

Located just steps from some of the most popular spots on the University of South Florida campus lies a hidden gem, the USF Botanical Gardens.

From whimsical plant displays and breathtaking views of the water to educational facilities, the gardens have been offering a wide variety of services to USF students for over three decades.

The gardens were established in 1969 and were used primarily as a research and education facility. Throughout the 1970’s the biology department was the only educational group to conduct research within the gardens.

It wasn’t until the mid-1980’s that the area was expanded, incorporating the palm garden, wetland forest and many of the other displays seen today. During this expansion period university staff aimed to create an area that all students could use. Garden Director Laurie Walker says that today almost every college utilizes the space.

“We have classes from the college of fine arts, arts and sciences and engineering,” Walker said.

However, as the gates opened to the public in the 1990’s the gardens shifted to incorporate aspects of relaxation and recreation.

“We also have picnic tables, benches, beautiful places to sit and relax and study or have lunch drawing in the public for a unique look at Florida’s natural beauty,” Walker said.

University of South Florida sophomore Mack Galdames says it is the perfect place for him to take a break from the stress of school work.

“I usually come out here by the lake and sometimes just stare or I’ll read a book or play guitar,” Galdames said. “It’s just a wonderful peaceful place. It’s isolated and it’s not isolated, it’s got a balance to it.”

Florida Studio Theatre Improv brings excitement to Sarasota

If there’s one thing that you can find an abundance of at Florida Studio Theatre Improv, it’s laughter. Florida Studio Theatre  is located in downtown Sarasota off Palm Avenue. The theatre features musicals, plays, improv and a full restaurant and bar.

Palm Ave

 

 

 

 

The FST Improv troupe has a new show every Saturday night.   This season’s show is called Out of Bounds. It incorporates two teams that compete for points given by the audience. The teams can range from as little as two cast members to as many as four. The winning team receives a trophy they get to keep until next week’s show where they compete all over again.

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One of the most important aspects of improv is rehearsal. The entire troupe gathers at 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays to practice improv games and discuss how to improve their acting.  Darryl Knapp is a performer for FST Improv.

“I think rehearsal is very important because it is good for camaraderie for one thing, to get to know other players,” said Knapp.

Rehearsal

Normally one wouldn’t think of preparation as something that goes into a show that is thought up on the spot. However Chris Friday, who also performs with FST Improv, feels strongly that it is preparation is key.

“It’s very important. We don’t rehearse what we’re going to do in the shows as far as these are the lines we’re going to use or any of those kinds of things. Because we’re really creating the show with the audience in the moment. But you rehearse the technique of the game and part of that rehearsal and part of what makes an improve show go so well is playing with people,” said Friday.

FST Improv also features piano accompaniment. Not all improv troupes have a pianist to accompany the scenes, so FST makes use of the piano to enhance the shows. Pianist Hunter Brown brings his unique skills to the table.

“I’ve been playing piano since I was 8 years old. And I was like ‘yeah sure’ so I ended up playing a little diddy from there, for some reason they had enough faith in me to be the accompanist for this and I had no idea what to get into. But I was just like ‘yeah sure I’ll do it’. And from there I guess it ended up turning out really well cause I feel like my talents suit improve pretty well,” said Brown.

Hunter Brown

The Florida Studio Theatre tries to get as much audience participation as possible. They lay out suggestion cards on the tables before the performance that the audience can fill out. The scenes are then used in the shows.

Scenes from a Can

Improv is a popular thing, not only in the Tampa area but also around the country. Edith Jones is an audience member for one of the Out of Bounds shows.

“I love improv. But I’ve never been to it in Sarasota so I thought it would be fun to see how it is. I’m looking forward to it,” said Jones.

There is no doubt that when you go to an FST show, you’ll have a great time.

 

Festa Italiana spreads Italian culture

 

Festa Italiana was hosted in Ybor City for the 18th year with the help of Joe Capitano Jr. The festival, celebrating Italian culture in Centennial Park, took place Thursday afternoon through Sunday afternoon.

The celebration of Italian culture allows the community to come together to share the culture and support local businesses, while raising funds for the Italian Club of Tampa.

“It brings awareness to Ybor,” Alice Mueller, the Italian Club manager said. “Sometimes there’s a negative connotation attached to Ybor City, but really it’s a great place to come.”

The Italian Club begins preparing for the event in August each year and continues working up until the event takes place in April.

Over 15 thousand people attended each day. Every day offers unique events to draw in crowds.

The annual Bocce Ball tournament takes place Saturday morning, while Sunday morning kicks off with a Catholic mass in the Italian Club.

Following mass, Centennial Park opens up to the public where over 100 food and beverage vendors line up along the street to sell their unique dishes and drinks.

“It’s really a family event,” Gilda Ferlita Capitano, President of the Italian Club, said.

Though family is near to many Italian’s hearts, food is a close second.

“Food, Italian food, a bunch of other Italians they get it,” Andrea Diaz, a festival attendee said.  “When they see loud voices, big gestures, it’s welcomed.”

Gilda Capitano couldn’t be prouder of her son Joe Capitano Jr. who works hard to ensure this event lives on.

“Seeing so many people together, it’s really just gratifying,” Gilda Capitano said.

 

Saturday Night Live, Donald Trump creates controversy

Over the years, Saturday Night Live has been involved in many racism scandals over its four decades on the air. The award-winning sketch series is under fire again after they announced that presidential candidate Donald Trump, who is known for his recent racist comments, will be hosting the show Nov. 7.

The announcement caused people to question whether the show and its network, NBC, truly believes in the racial stereotypes they seem to perpetuate, or if it’s just a ratings game.

via Creative Commons

Last year, Saturday Night Live came under fire for their race issues after their decision to hire six white actors stirred up conversation about the lack of diversity in the show’s cast. At the time, there were no black women and only two black men on the show.

As pointed out by National Public Radio, the lack of diversity in the cast is representative of the bigger picture.

“It’s true that talented performers can and should be allowed to play characters of different ethnicities and cultures. But there’s a long history in American entertainment of locking out talented performers of color by letting white entertainers play racial and ethnic minorities. In the 21st century, it would be nice to see a sketch comedy show with 16 cast members find a way to allow a Latino or black performer to play such characters, at least occasionally.”

After people began noticing Saturday Night Live’s exclusion of black women, producers decided to hold an audition with a concentration on minority women in early 2014. They hired two female, African-American writers, LaKendra Tookes and Leslie Jones, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

During this same time period, they also hired another African- American woman, Sasheer Zamata, as an on-stage performer and promoted a young black man, Michael Che, to a more important role as the co-anchor on their famous Weekend Update segment.

With all of the racially diverse additions to Saturday Night Live, one might think that would be the end of their racial insensitivity, but their decision to have presidential candidate Donald Trump host the show on Nov. 7 has put them under fire yet again.

According to a recent NPR article, there could be an ulterior motive behind the decision:

“Donald Trump’s upcoming appearance hosting SNL has drawn the ire of Latino groups, who note the show is featuring someone who has made bigoted comments about Mexican immigrants at a time when there are no Latino cast members on the program. This isn’t a new problem for SNL; there have only been two Latino members in the show’s 40-year history.

Trump’s return to the SNL hosting gig comes months after NBC dumped the GOP front-runner as host of its Celebrity Apprentice series and dropped participation in his Miss USA and Miss Universe pageants. The reason, according to a statement from NBC in July: ‘derogatory statements by Trump regarding immigrants.’

Before Trump’s SNL hosting gig, he’ll appear in a town hall Monday on NBC hosted byToday show anchor Matt Lauer. There’s a sense here that NBC is mending fences with its onetime star; given his status as GOP front-runner and media magnet, ratings and relevance seemed to have, um, trumped concerns about any past ‘derogatory statements.'”

This poses the question: Are the makers of Saturday Night Live showing racial prejudice or are ratings and fame more important than issues of race?

 

USF School of Music Student is Nominated for GRAMMY Award

Jose Ruiz may seem like your average student at the University of South Florida, but it turns out, there is a little more behind the music major than meets the eye.

“He is actually the first student from USF to be nominated for any sort of GRAMMY,” Dr. McCormick, a USF professor who has worked with Ruiz for over 20 years, said.

At just 28-years-old, Ruiz has been nominated to win a Latin GRAMMY in the category of Best Latin Jazz Album.

“I first met Jose when he was 8. He was in the third grade. He’s always been very diversified in his musical interests,” McCormick said.

“Going in this project, it was never about me. I wanted to be inclusive and invite my students as well and even my dad, my dad who has been there for me this whole time. He’s nominated now because he was one of the producers, you know, of the album,” Ruiz said.

Jose earned his Bachelors in Music Studies at USF. After travelling to the University of Miami for his Master’s Degree, he returned to USF to teach students while also earning his Ph.D. in Music Education.

“Dr. McCormick, that’s her name. She’s responsible for teaching me how to be an expressive player through an instrument,” Ruiz said. “And my father is responsible for cultivating my innate ability to adapt to different musical settings and to improvise and to pick things up by ear.”

The 2015 Latin GRAMMY’S will be held this November in Las Vegas.

 

MOSI plans new exhibit

 

 

The Tampa Museum of Science and Industry is working on adding a new major exhibit that is scheduled to be up and running sometime this year.

“We’re not quite ready to reveal any secrets just yet,” said Megan Haskins, a member of MOSI Marketing and Communications, “but let’s just say we have some very exciting things coming, hopefully as early as the fall, so stand by.”

MOSI used to have a history of hosting traveling exhibits, such as a Titanic exhibit or Bodies, but in recent years the museum staff has decided to halt those and instead create their own new exhibits.

“We’ve decided to take an internal look at our core experience,” said Tanya Vomaka, Vice President of Guest Experience and Marketing. “We’ve been working very hard on updating our current visitor experience.”

While the museum staff has been very quiet about their new exhibit, they have said it has something to do with “looking to the future.”

The last major new addition to the museum was the inclusion of a 3-D printer exhibit, where visitors can watch the printer in action and see some of its creations.

The entertainment and education the museum provides makes it popular with families, getting roughly 500,000 to 800,000 guests per year, despite the big theme parks nearby.

MOSI admission is only a little over $20, and as a non-profit organization, ticket prices help to fund summer camp programs, MOSI’s own education classes and various scholarships.

Salsaween, the best of two worlds

 

Greg McBride had never been to an event quite like the Latin American Student Association’s Salsaween Halloween celebration on Wednesday evening.

McBride, a junior studying international business at USF Sarasota-Manatee, was visiting his friends at USF Tampa, and they decided to go to the event hosted in the Marshall Student Center Ballroom. He said he heard about the event from one of his friends and decided it would be a cool event to go to.

“I’m not in the club and neither are any of my friends,” McBride said. “But all of us are either from Peru or Venezuela so we know Spanish culture.”

Salsa music coming from the event in the ballroom could be heard upon entering the MSC. The lights were dim and there were Halloween decorations all around the room including a giant blow-up arch adorned with skulls in the entryway. There were balloons, tables with decorations and even food like chips and salsa and Cuban sandwiches. One of McBride’s favorite activities at the event was the photo booth.

“I went in with all my friends a bunch of times. There were a lot of props to choose from and I really liked the big crazy glasses and the hats,” McBride said. “I’ll go to any event that has a photo booth and free food.”

At one point during the evening there was a break from salsa music, and a student band came up and played a few popular songs. The dancing didn’t stop though. The crowd of about 150 people loved the music and seemed to enjoy it just as much as the Spanish music.

There was also a costume contest. Students were wearing everything from super hero costumes, to elegant dresses, to traditional salsa dancing outfits. Some students, like McBride and his friends, weren’t wearing costumes at all.

“I don’t really dress up,” he said. “I’m going to another Halloween event on Friday and I’m not wearing a costume for that either.”

Even though Salsaween was first and foremost a Halloween event, students and club members were able to come together and enjoy an evening of music, dancing, food and friends. It is one of the club’s most anticipated events each year.

“I’ve had a lot of fun here so far and I would want to go to another event hosted by the club,” McBride said. “And I loved being able to come with my friends and meet other people who appreciate Spanish culture.”

 

Local band takes Tampa by storm

A local band, The Applebutter Express, is drawing in crowds from all over the bay area. Kyle and Shannon Biss started the band as a vocal duo back in 2004 when they met in high school before getting married in 2011. Since then, they added Joe Trivette as a fiddle player and Matt Desear as the bassist to complete the band.

“I always knew that Shannon could sing because she was in chorus, but she wanted nothing to do with it at first,” Kyle said. “She didn’t want to sing in front of a bunch of people. Once I finally got her up there the first time, she was fine and I realized we had this chemistry on stage together.”

The Applebutter Express has a unique sound given to their use of stringed-instruments like the ukulele played by Kyle. Their folk-like, bluegrass style is more uplifting than most music played today. What first started as a hobby for the band, has led to performances all throughout Florida and even to other states for festivals such as Bonnaroo.

“We would start to go to local festivals and campsites, walk around and perform for people around there by singing and playing around,” Shannon said. “We didn’t think of doing anything professional yet. We decided one night after so many positive responses from people that maybe we can do something with this. That was enough encouragement to go to open mics and tryout for local gigs and now it’s a whole thing.”

The band members do not focus on a certain niche when it comes to their audience and their eclectic music has drawn in a variety of listeners from children to seniors. 

“What’s really funny to me is that kids just take to us,” Shannon said. “I guess that we are good dancing music for kids. Really we get crowds of all ages because we do a lot of 60s and 70s covers and that kind of thing. That’s the music that we are really into, Allman Brothers and Grateful Dead, so we get a lot of older fans from that.  But we get a little bit of everybody.  A lot of people you wouldn’t expect.”

The Applebutter Express already released two CDs and plans to have more. Their recently signed publishing deal and featured song “Hey, my brotha”  in Ron Howard’s film “The Good Lie” foreshadows they have nothing but a successful future to look forward to for years to come.

 

 

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In ambitious exhibit, Tampa Museum of Art showcases works by USF’s Graphicstudio

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Todd Smith is changing the face of art exhibits in the Tampa Bay area.

The Tampa Museum of Art executive director has put together countless art exhibits for the museum since he started his position in 2008.

Smith has partnered with the University of South Florida to hold an exhibition in the Tampa Museum of Art titled “Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF.

“We’ve brought all of our staffs together to collaborate and put together this show, which is the largest ever to look at the history of graphic studio,” Smith said.

The exhibit, one of the largest that the Tampa Museum of Art has seen, has been a success.

“There was a huge turnout for both artists and appreciators of art,” Smith said.

One was USF College of Visual Arts alumni Lindsey Batz.

“Being in Tampa is great opportunity,  having the Tampa Museum of Art so close,” Batz said. “It will kind of bring you back to what you have going on in school as far as, you know, having your professor’s work, having your peer’s work. Everything you see kind of brings out a new little piece.”

USF Japanese Club welcomes spring with Haru Matsuri Festival

Spring is a big deal in Japan.  The cherry blossom represents the changing of the season to the people, and Haru Matsuri is the festival that ushers in the warmer weather.

The Japanese Club at USF puts on its own version of Haru Matsuri to educate students more about the culture.

Lisa Ton is one of the senior members.

“Here, we celebrate spring by presenting our own spring festival,” Ton said. “We have Japanese food, games and performances, and we just try to bring a slice of Japanese spring to USF.”

The club features organizations such as the USF Judo and Aikido clubs at the festival. They also provide experts to talk about traditional and new art forms, dances, cuisines and practices that are emerging in Japan.

One of these experts is Seth Cole, a collector of Japanese War memorabilia from World War II.

“I love sharing history of people,” Cole said. “I believe when you can touch history hands-on, it reinforces the stories of our grandfathers. It makes it a little more real.”

Even as a non-Japanese member of the club, Cole has felt more than welcome every time he presents his collection or attends a meeting.

“I’ve been welcomed with open arms and have made some truly incredible friendships,” he said.

Japanese Club festivals like Haru Matsuri build a bridge for students to learn about a culture that may be very far and foreign for them.  It also provides a forum for Japanese students to interact with and relate to students of different cultures.

University of South Florida Student Recitals

The University of South Florida’s School of Music currently features its own junior and senior students during recital season.

Recitals are a part of both junior and senior music majors’ curriculum.

Junior and music education major Kelsey Donahoo had her clarinet recital March 31.

“I was just so excited to show everyone all these technical abilities that I’m able to do,” Donahoo said. “Once I took that final bow I was thinking ‘Wow, that’s another big step towards graduation. It’s almost here.’ ”

Students are responsible for not only picking and practicing their musical selections, but reserving the room and getting the word out too.

They create the flyers that are posted throughout the School of Music as well as the programs that are handed out to people as they walk into the Lewis and Enid Barness Recital Hall.

“I think it’s a great bonding thing for everybody,” said physics major and vocalist Regina Battista. “I think it’s such a great opportunity for everybody to learn and for everybody to learn about each other as well.”

Recitals take plenty of preparation with music students practicing many months prior to when recital season starts. They also have weekly lessons with their assigned music professor to practice their pieces.

“In college you’re mostly in your ensembles and then I’m focusing on teaching,” said Donahoo. “So to be able to build up my clarinet professional skills up to this level to be able to perform my own solo performance was an amazing experience.”

Recital season will continue until the end of the month.

NOMAD Art Bus Paints Smiles on Faces of Tampa Bay Children

Carrie Boucher’s mouth moves and syllables pirouette out. Sometimes they’re punctuated by smiles. Sometimes they’re not.

When she talks about the way she started her project — an interactive mobile art machine — you can see the enthusiasm swell in her eyes and pool to her feet in a colorful swirl.

Every so often, she tucks a piece of brown hair behind her ear with paint-stained hands: mermaid blue, ballerina pink and Fruit Gushers green. She continues talking, but the hands tell her story as the former teacher who refused to let art be treated trivially. In fact, Boucher grew up flouting the rules.

“In art class I quietly broke the rules and used tools and materials in any way I imagined might lead me to a new discovery,” Boucher wrote on her blog.

Beneath the dried tempera, her hands are worn. She spent a year teaching art to children in schools before she became “Lead Nomad” in her new venture: an art bus that travels to festivals and occasionally serves as an after-school program.

How could she expect to teach children to create, to express themselves and to love art if they kept getting pulled for FCAT tutoring?

“There will always be children who won’t be good at reading or math,” Boucher said. “But to not give them exposure to other things they might be good at and feel good about that could lead to a career for them is really limiting, and that’s frustrating to me.”

Instead of complaining about the school system, Boucher set out to create.

The art teacher wanted to create a program in St. Petersburg that would offer kids the resources to express themselves through art. She wanted everyone to have access, even if they couldn’t afford it or didn’t have the transportation. As her non-profit’s creed says, she wanted to bring the art-making experience to the people.

The NOMAD Art Bus was born.

From the inside, the bus is a shabby slice of an art classroom. The art lesson changes with the scene, but on one recent day, red Solo cups hugged Crayolas on a long plank where children, parents, and a few hipster strays escape from the mayhem of Localtopia 2015 to fold origami squares into hearts. Volunteers offer their heart-folding guidance and LEDs to nestle in the squares to make their hearts shine.

From the outside, the bus is an art-making temple. It’s hard to imagine the brightly splattered machine as its naked predecessor. The sherbet-colored brushstrokes on its exterior offer excerpts from hundreds of children and families: “Bikes for Life,” “Recycle,” “Love your planet,” “R hearts K,” “Follow me on Instagram,” “Aliens Exist,” and “To Shelby.” Beneath the paint lies ghosts of brushstrokes from thousands more. Although this time the bus is dipped in complementary hues of pinks and oranges, the bus was once a calamity of crayon.

Originally, the nomadic bus was doctor’s-coat-white. You wouldn’t have known the difference between the NOMAD Art Bus and a greasy moving van. Boucher knew something would eventually be painted on the outside of the bus — maybe a mural, she thought.

The monotone mobile made its way to the Gasparilla Festival of the Arts in 2014. The line to get inside the bus was snaking infinitely, and guests were getting bored and leaving. In attempts to keep her guests entertained long enough to stay in line and experience the inside of the bus, Boucher unveiled the crayons, and the iconic colorful exterior of the art bus was born.

Although the team switched to tempera, little has changed since.

When Carina Giuffre, 8, was asked outside about her favorite part of the bus, she held up her dripping pink art wand, appearing lost in introspection.

“Painting,” Carina said.

Washing it is another story.

USF fine arts graduates put what they’ve learned on display

Clayton Petras is one of only 20 University of South Florida students graduating with a bachelor of fine arts this semester. One of the requirements to earn his degree is to collaborate with classmates and plan his final show at USF.

The weeklong USF Thesis Exhibit is hosted by the graduating seniors majoring in fine arts.

“You’re making a concise body of work and basically showing of the best of what you’ve learned,” Petras said.

A mix of art forms,from painting to sculpture to photography and more, will be displayed at the exhibit. Petras and fellow BFA student John Berdanier are both printmakers.

“I found printmaking as a way to create art faster, more efficiently, and I’ve really enjoyed what I’ve learned” Berdanier said.

Petras started working with the medium in high school and fell in love with it.

“I kind of already knew what I wanted to do, and that was a big step in terms of freshman year,” Petras said. “When everyone is taking their ‘gen-eds,’ I’m just taking them to get them out of they way so I can be taking art classes full time.”

Petras’ artwork typically depicts human and various animals’ anatomies. He says his mother, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, has largely influenced the subject matter of his art.

“My mom has Parkinson’s, and so just watching the mental breakdown, as well as the physical one that affects the body — those are kind of the themes I’m dealing with: decay and death and the inevitability of it, but also the beauty in it,” Petras said.

The USF Thesis Exhibit will be debut April 20 and run through May 1 at The Vault in downtown Tampa. For more information, visit www.arts.usf.edu.

Photo Gallery: Local Designer showcases Earth-inspired fashions for her new line

For years, Julia Chew has been creating fashions out of her Tampa home for her line, “Xiaolin.” At 20-years-old, Chew has already made hundreds of items that have been showcased across the globe. She is currently working on the “Phoenix Bird” that will be displayed at an upcoming fashion show.

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Although it may look like a regular living room, to Julia Chew, a designer, it’s a place where her creativity is brought to life.
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Chew’s creations  usually begin on paper, and when they are ready to be conceived, she gathers her fabric and a few simple tools including needles, thread and measurement sticks.
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Chew begins with a dress form that works as the blank canvas for her fashions.
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After hours of hand sewing, Chew uses the dress form to hold her handmade fashions, like the “Phoenix Bird.”
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Inspired by the Earth and its animals, many of Chew’s designs feature colors and elements common to the planet. On the “Phoenix Bird,” in particular, Chew hand sews hundreds of dyed feathers onto the dress.
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For years, Chew has been designing fashions like the “Phoenix Bird.” Her line, “Xiaolin,” has been displayed in boutiques around the country and recognized in magazines and fashion shows across the world. Photos by Cassaundra Palmer.

 

Photo Gallery: The Faces Modeling Troupe Brings Crime Scene Style to USF

The Marshall Center Ballroom at the University of South Florida appeared to be a crime scene the evening of March 15 as The Faces Modeling Troupe and USF’s Faces collegiate chapter took the stage with a CSI-themed fashion show. There are seven Faces Modeling Troupes throughout Florida, and the USF chapter is making its comeback.

The USF chapter’s vice president and fashion coordinator, Jessica Davis-Hall, says the CSI theme is about “where we have come from and where we’ve been. We have been missing from campus, and the story evolves with us reappearing in the crime story.”

Faces, a non-profit organization, puts on shows every semester.

The collegiate chapter adviser, Terry White, said Faces helps to “keep kids from getting in trouble and help aspiring models get their name out there.”

CAUTION: extreme sexy about to take the stage in the Marshall Center Ballroom Sunday night with the Faces Modeling Troupe USF chapter.

Rows of seats wait to be filled right before USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI-themed event Sunday, March 15, 2015. The caution tape warns of the extremely sexy models taking stage at 7 p.m. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

Terry White, the USF Faces chapter advisor, receives news that the doors are about to burst with excited patrons.

Terry White, the USF Faces Modeling Troupe chapter advisor, receives word that excited patrons are waiting outside the door of the Marshall Center Ballroom for the CSI-themed event Sunday, March 15, 2015, at 7 p.m.

Anticipation rises as fashion show patrons wait to support their favorite models.

Patrons and Fashion lovers wait for USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI-themed fashion show to begin, and their favorite models to walk out in the Marshall Center Ballroom on Sunday, March 15, 2015, at 7 p.m. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

"We got any Jamaicans in the house?" Eager patrons rep their heritage at the FCSI Fashion Show.

Eager patrons respond to the question “We got any Jamaicans in the house?” at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015, at 7 p.m. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

Draped in caution tape and black patent later, Jessica Davis-Hall  is no stranger to the camera. Work those angles, girl!

Draped in caution tape and black patent leather, Jessica Davis-Hall is no stranger to the camera as she walks down the catwalk at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. Work those angles, Girl! (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

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Donning nude leotards, the “Autopsy” act features models of all shapes and sizes at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

"Faces has been left vulnerable. Betrayal has ruined Faces and left it to fend for itself." The "Autopsy" act featured all shapes and sizes donning nude leotards.

Donning nude leotards, the “Autopsy” act features models of all shapes and sizes at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

The stems on Jessica Davis-Hall are hard to ignore as she struts the runway during the "Autopsy" act in a sparkly nude leotard.

Donning nude leotards, the “Autopsy” act features models of all shapes and sizes at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

During intermission,  fashionable male attendees take to the catwalk and compete for "best dressed."

During intermission, fashionable male attendees take to the catwalk and compete for “best dressed” at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

The "Conviction/ Acquitted" act featured more stripes than a jail in summertime. These models got the stripes and the groove.

The “Conviction/ Acquitted” act features more stripes than a jail in summertime at USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe’s CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. These models have the stripes and the groove. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

Friends of Jessica Davis-Hall show congratulatory love to their favorite model, fashion coordinator and vice president of the Faces USF chapter.

Friends of Jessica Davis-Hall show congratulatory hugs to their favorite model, fashion coordinator and vice president of the Faces USF chapter at the CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

All models take your places! The FACES gang gathers for a final photo after a successful fashion show.

The models of USF’s Faces Modeling Troupe gather for a photo after a successful CSI fashion show Sunday, March 15, 2015. All models take your places! (Photo Credit: Elizabeth Fairchild)

 

 

USF senior passionate about performing arts shoots for the stars

Many have fantasized, at one point or another, about being a famous entertainer. Most, however, do not pursue those dreams.  Naomy Ambroise, a young Tampa performer,  is determined to turn those dreams into reality.

Ambroise is a senior enrolled in the School of Theatre and Dance at the University of South Florida.   She has only been involved in theater since high school, but if you ask the students at the college, Ambroise’s name stands out.

“Naomy is very multi-talented, very dedicated and truly inspiring,” said Danielle James, fellow dance and theater arts student.

Being a performing arts career is not easy.  Besides theater performance, students take ballet classes on body disciplines and memorize pieces for performance in class regularly. The two weeks while a show is being put on require 14-hour days.

“I chose to be a performing arts major because there was just like a satisfaction you get from being able to reach people,” said Ambroise.

Ambroise has been involved in four productions while at USF.  She recently auditioned in New York for acceptance into theater graduate schools; 11 more are interested.  She plans to attend after graduation or become an apprentice for a theater company.

3-D PRINTING COMES TO USF STUDENTS

In the past decade, 3D printing has seen a large rise on the consumer front. Three years ago the University of South Florida brought this resource to students and faculty.

Using their Bullbucks, students can make 3D prints for $0.06 per ounce, with a minimum print of $1.00 . The 3D printing lab is located in the Advanced Visualization Center (AVC).

The physical aspect of the 3-D prints has drawn students of different disciplines, like Matthew Wedebrock, who works in the 3D printing lab.

“I like to make simulations, video games, so being able to actually take some of those 3D models and see them, feel them in real life, is a wonderful thing,” said Wedebrock.

In order to be able to make a print, students must come with a 3D model, which can be created from scratch on a variety of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) programs or found on social media sharing sites.

Howard Kaplan is a visualization developer in the Advanced Visualization Center. Kaplan,a graduate of Ringling College of Art and Design, has 10 years of digital arts experience.

“There are many different ways in which you can get a 3D model. You can use a CAD software to build up your model, you can use digital sculpting tools that are freely available,” said Kaplan. “Even Photoshop has the ability of taking an image and kind of doing a 2D, 2.5D, or 3D extrude to it and then exporting out for 3D printing.”

Several times during the semester, CAD workshops are given in SCA 222. The printing lab is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Visualization Lab is open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For more information, visit the AVC website at avc.web.usf.edu.

Spanish restaurant in Tampa still dances with tradition

 Ybor City’s Spanish and Cuban restaurant, the Columbia, was founded by Casimiro Hernandez Sr. in 1905. The Spanish traditions of the restaurant have been carried through family generations for over 100 years.

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“I enjoy the food here,” said Columbia customer Mark Anthony Puglio. “The food here is excellent. It always has been, since I was young.”

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