USF Students Welcome New Living Community

Every university has those infamous dorms – built decades ago – that the university is still leasing out to students each year. USF’s version of these dorms are in the Andros community, and after 50 years, Andros is finally being remodeled.

Some of the big changes include new and improved dorms, retail stores and even an on-campus Publix grocery store. Carolina Zapatas, a current resident, welcomes the changes.

“Knocking all this down is better for the new students because it will bring new opportunities and nicer living areas,” said Zapatas.

Not only will the dorms be nicer but they will also house 1000 more students. Creating bigger dorms is an attempt by USF to get more students to live on campus, and to get away from the university’s “commuter school” reputation.

Adding retail stores and an on-campus grocery store are incentives for students to live on campus because everything they need will be walking distance.

“I think it’s a great idea that they are building a Publix on campus so all the students living on campus who don’t have cars, can just walk there and won’t have to worry or take a bus,” said former Andros resident Isabella Wilson.

There has been no official confirmation of which retail stores will be available on campus, but the Publix will be built by the end of 2017.

 

 

USF holds vibrant rally in preparation for FSU showdown

The University of South Florida hosts a festive and optimistic pep rally to prepare for the game against Florida State University. Students gathered around cheering on the USF football players as they enjoyed the energetic vibes.

This game is expected to be a sold out event USF student Lera Koch said, “It’s the first game since I have been at USF that is going to be a 300 level for students section and actually for all fans in general; so I think its going to be super awesome I think the energy is going to be crazy.”

For a university that lacks school pride, the pep rally was full of pride and hope for a victory against FSU.

“FSU is going to get demolished by the bulls they have no chance against us,” said Juan Garcia a fan who chanted green and gold throughout the pep rally.

There is no doubt that the fans will cheer on the green and gold after the USF football team defeated Syracuse giving the bulls hope for a win considering FSU loss against Louisville.

The USF football team has evolved and is ready to take on FSU, with a body of students who chant loud and proud “Go Bulls.”

 

Singing for Shriners Reaches New Heights, Hospital Shows Appreciation

In 2012, the University of South Florida chapter of the Theta Chi fraternity had a wonderful idea for a philanthropy event that would provide fundraising for a worthwhile cause. The event would also intend to provide incredible entertainment for all involved. Theta Chi focused on the local community and realized that they could help bring funding and awareness to the Shriners Hospitals for Children-Tampa located on USF’s campus.

Groups, primarily from the Greek community, collaborate in order to select two songs to be performed on the day of the event. This year, the concert had the most registered groups ever, with 10 female performances and 5 male performances competing for the title of champions.

So where does the fundraising come in? That process begins months before the actual day of the event. Each group contributes a registration fee and is expected to make an effort to raise funds from the USF community by encouraging t-shirt and ticket sales. The higher the funds raised, more points are added to the overall performance scores at Singing for Shriners.

When performance day came along, the Theta Chi brothers experienced an unexpected dilemma, as the audience reached maximum capacity in the theatre. Of all the problems that they could have faced this was a welcome one.

Jessica Hill, the Public Relations Specialist at Shriners-Tampa, was front and center for the show, even speaking on behalf of the hospital to the crowd.

“It means so much to have the support”, she said. “Theta Chi, in doing this, is helping to send love to the rescue for so many kids in our area.”

USF student Ally Lindsay has been attending the event for several years and she said that although it’s always nice to have a night full of entertainment, having representatives from the Hospital in attendance, “It'[s] a very important part of the event because you can see these people and see where all the money that everyone’s raising is going to.”

The performances didn’t disappoint and the crowd was enthralled from beginning to end. Perhaps the best part of the evening was finishing off the event with Theta Chi handing over a check to Shriner’s Hospital for $11,000.

DJ turned USF professor keeping podcasting alive

In February of 2015, WMNF Tampa brought in a man with decades of experience to be their general manger. The man is Craig Kopp and he has been working in radio and news stations since graduating from Bowling Green University. WMNF is a little old fashion, it holds thousands of CD’s and records within their walls.

“We have one of the largest record and CD collections available in the country,” says Kopp. “Other radio stations are using computers, but I like this option because people may see an album they have not heard in years and want to listen to that.”

Kopp is not just managing the radio station, he is also on air with his podcast Everyday Ethics. He hosts the podcast with Kelly McBride, from the Poynter Institute, and discusses a wide range of topics. The topics range from breastfeeding in pubic to the Zika Virus.

As if that doesn’t sound like enough of a workload, Kopp started teaching at the University of South Florida this past spring. He is teaching a podcasting class. During the semester, Kopp shows the students how to record and edit the podcast, as well as prepare for asking the right questions during the interview.

Chuck Muller is a student at USF and really enjoys Kopp’s teaching methods.

“Professor Kopp has a very interesting way of teaching,” Muller said. “You think that you’re just recording a podcast, but he really emphasizes the prep work that goes into writing your questions and not necessarily sticking to the script during the interview.”

Kopp, who is 64-years-old, has no plans on retiring. He wants to continue working until he physically can’t anymore. “Why would I want to stop doing what I love? Kopp said.

 

USF’s Bullstock to Host Local Performers Student Bands

The University of South Florida is ready to celebrate their most eventful week of the year, as its annual USF week began on Monday. USF week is a week-long celebration, headlined by the Bullstock music concert on Friday night.

“Bullstock is the biggest event USF has to offer,” Richard Scibetti , a coordinator at the University’s Center for Student Involvement who oversees Bullstock, said.

The event has hosted bands such as Panic! at the Disco, Young the Giant, Thirty Seconds to Mars, and Twenty One Pilots. This year, the organizers decided to do something different.

“This year we wanted more of a festival feel,” Scibetti said. “Where there is no big key headliner. There is a group of bands that have their different audiences.”

The performers at this years Bullstock are New Politics, Børns, and a package of bands featured in this years Vans Warped Tour. Those bands are Mayday Parade, The Maine, Reckless Serenade and Assuming We Survive.

The event also showcases some of USF’s talent as well. Athena Bressack, who oversees USF Week as a whole, said that this was her favorite part about Bullstock.

“The first two bands that open (Bullstock) are student bands,” Bressack said, “Earlier in March we had an event called Battle of the Bands that we have every year and there is a judge winner and a people’s choice winner. So both of those bands get to open up Bullstock and who knows? Maybe they’ll be headliners somewhere one day.”

Bullstock is expected to draw a crowd of over 5,000 people. The event kicks off at 5 p.m. in parking lot 22D at the USF Sun Dome.

Bullstock is free and open to the public.

Aspirations of Change For A University of South Florida Junior

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Chelsea Spampinato has always loved animals of all kinds. Last August, the then 19-year-old Chelsea and her father, Giorgio, circled a ranch looking for the newest addition to their family.

They had chosen to rescue a rehabilitated pet and Chelsea ultimately decided on a curious little gentleman who followed her around the ranch sticking his nose up her dress.

The technical term for his nose being his trunk, considering Chelsea’s new pet was an elephant. His name is Kariba, which means strength in Zimbabwe.

Chelsea is from Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. It is not uncommon in Zimbabwe to adopt wild animals, like antelope and rhinos, from wildlife sanctuaries, where they will grow up and their owners can visit them as often as they would like.

“She had already adopted seven puppies, so I figured why not add an elephant to the mix,” Giorgio said. “I was a safari leader and so was my son Vittorio, so I am glad that I got the chance to instill this love of animals in both of my children.”

Every summer Chelsea’s father takes their family on a self-guided safari in Hwange, the largest national park in Zimbabwe.

“We go out to the bush for about a week,” Chelsea said. “Since my dad and brother both used to be professional guides, we go out on our own routes, take our own cars and find the animals ourselves which is a really big deal now because a lot of safari’s are set up and kind of fake. I like being able to get the realistic view of Zimbabwe as a native.”

It is her love of animals that has brought Chelsea to schooling so far from home. She decided that if she ever wanted to own her own ranch, which is a great expense, she would have to get a high paying job first. She knew she wanted to attend school in America and chose the University of South Florida because of its warm weather.

The poisoning of water holes at Hwange national park, which killed nearly 300 elephants in the past year inspired Chelsea to work for change.

She wants to participate in the efforts to stop the mass poaching of elephants and other wild animals by one day work for the World Wildlife Fund or even the United Nations so she chose to pursue an international law degree.

Kariba’s mother was poached when he was three weeks old. The herd abandoned him and he was unable to learn how to use his trunk, an essential part of an elephant’s development. He was rescued by the Imire wildlife sanctuary, where he would gain use of his trunk and later meet Chelsea.

While it is hard being so far away from her pets and family, she is driven by her desire to protect the wildlife that is being hunted, not only in Zimbabwe but around the world.

Since coming to the University of South Florida, Chelsea has joined a sorority on campus. The fun fact that she often gives in the form of ice breakers during class or sorority activities is often about Kariba.

“At first I didn’t believe her,”Rachel Manning said, Chelsea’s best friend at school. “Then she showed me pictures and it is just so crazy that I know someone with an elephant as a pet. Now I tell all my friends back home about it.”

Chelsea has not been able to see her elephant since winter break last December. She receives photos and videos of Kariba, who is just over a year old now, from her father.

Giorgio visits Kariba at the ranch about once a week. He said Kariba is getting so big, the next time Chelsea goes to visit him she better be careful because he might accidentally sit on her.

 

USF’s annual career fair looks to bring career opportunities for students

Nearly 3,000 USF students flocked to the Marshall Student Center Ballroom last week for the annual USF Career Fair.

Students from all different majors were able to speak with hundreds of employers across the four different fairs held throughout the week. They were able to discuss future internship and employment opportunities in their chosen career fields.

“I’m excited about Career Fair because it’s a great opportunity to make connections and kind of get my foot in the door at the start of my career,” USF accounting major, Mitchel Geron, said.

The fair has been held twice a year, one in each fall and spring semester, for over 20 years on USF campus. This fair has given many students the platforms they need to learn the opportunities they have with the degree they will earn.

“Many of these interactions will lead to full-time job interviews, internship interviews, and summer employment opportunities,” Assistant Vice President of USF Career Services, Russ Coughenour, said.

USF Career Services will return with another career fair in the fall of 2016 with more employers and opportunities for students to network with major organizations.

Coughenour finished by stating, “These fairs get USF students the valuable out of classroom experience that they so desperately need so each year Career Services is very proud to bring Career Week to USF students.”

Author James Morrow gives lecture at USF

On Monday, March 21, 2016 renowned science fiction author, James Morrow, will be visiting USF to discuss his new novel, “Galapagos Regained”.

Morrow will be giving a lecture on the fourth floor of USF’s library at 6:00 p.m. where he will discuss issues of science, religion, and pop culture. Joining Morrow will be fellow science fiction author and USF professor, Rick Wilbur.

“I’ve been in the science fiction community for a long time,” said Wilbur. “Getting Morrow to do this lecture was as easy as some scheduling and making phone calls to a comrade.”

After a small amount of aligning schedules between Wilbur, the university, and Morrow, the author is set to discuss his latest novel as a part of USF’s humanities institute’s lecture series.

“I urge all students who can make it to attend Morrow’s lecture,” said Wilbur. “He’s an incredible author and this is a great opportunity to discuss contemporary issues with a knowledgeable professional.”

Morrow, a self-proclaimed scientific humanist, is an author famous for his unconventional historical novels, which often examine the intertwining concepts of religion and science. His latest novel, “Galapagos Regained” plot centers on a Victorian adventurer who decides to repeat the voyages of Charles Darwin.

Anyone, whether a student, faculty or community member, will be able to attend both Morrow’s lecture and the event’s reception and book signing free of cost.

USF alumni eats like a caveman

 A young entrepreneur has taken her passion for eating healthy and combined it with her passion for cookies to create her own company Base Culture. This company is not like any other sweets retailer that sales brownies and banana bread; all of the products are paleo friendly, meaning they follow the popular Paleo Diet.

“The Paleo Diet is nicknamed the caveman diet for a reason” says Base Culture founder Jordann Windschauer, “If you were to follow the Paleo Diet, you eat meat, vegetables, seeds, nuts, and fruit.” Windschauer praises the diet and even goes on to say that she felt “more alive than ever and had more energy than she had had in years.”

While the Paleo Diet did have its ups it also had its downs. Windschauer enjoyed the new found energy boost, but she also missed all the sweets she used to eat.

“You know it got really hard not being able to just grab banana bread on the way to work in the morning. I looked for products that could satisfy my sweet tooth but would also satisfy paleo requirements but there were none” said Windschauer. It was that same day she took matters into her own hand and stated creating “sweets” that were made solely from seeds, nuts, and fruits.

She then took her paleo friendly sweets she baked to her local gym to share with her friends and they became an instant hit. People soon began offering compensation for her products, and overnight the company Base Culture was created.

Many customers have claimed to not even taste the difference between paleo friendly brownies and regular brownies. “I just tasted it and it’s actually really good and it’s awesome that it’s really healthy” said satisfied customer Lexi Ashby.

The idea of paleo friendly products has taken the market by force. Since the company’s beginning in 2013, Base Culture products are now available in over 50 stores nationwide and will soon be available in Walmart.

 

 

 

 

From Bikes to Books

 

One clear evening last February, amid the crowd of screaming fans and the stench of race fuel permeating the stadium, Bodie Colangelo walked away from his professional motocross career to focus on a new dream.

Having been dropped from his sponsors earlier that year, Colangelo was considered a privateer racer. Privateers paid for the sport out of pocket. With endless medical bills and large sums of money contributing to his profession, the wrist injury he suffered at that Supercross Arena competition had been the last straw.

“I realized the risks outweighed the reward,” Colangelo said. “I was constantly getting hurt and the money just wasn’t there.”

His success throughout his career had left him unprepared of what steps to take if it had ended. Attending a university after graduation had not been a consideration. The goal had been to focus on riding but Colangelo was forced to reconsider school as option after his injury.

“I felt if I wasn’t going to race anymore that I would go to school and pursue a degree in business,” Colangelo said. “At that point I was just ready to take it easy.”

Colangelo enrolled at Hillsborough Community College in the spring and has been focusing on completing his degree. The slower paced lifestyle gave light on how years of riding have affected his health.

“I’ve broken so many bones they have my racing jersey hanging in USF’s Morsani Center,” Colangelo said. “When the weather changes my bones will ache and I have constant back pain.”

David Colangelo, who served as a father, coach, mechanic and trainer while his son was a racer had also benefited from the change of pace. There were no days off between working as a supervisor at a Water Treatment Plant and traveling for races.
“Every sacrifice I made was worth it to see his dream come true,” David Colangelo said. “The focus is to now see him through school.”

On nostalgic days, Colangelo will take his bike out for a spin. He isn’t a stranger to his old racing track where he spent much of his adolescent years. Unable to stay away from hobbies that bring him a thrill, he has since shown interest in muscle cars and racecars.

Brandi Colangelo, the racers mother, has a hard time seeing her son in any dangerous sport. Staying home with the youngest sibling while her husband and son were away at races gave her plenty of time to worry. Now that the racing days are behind them she now faces a new wave of fear with her son’s new obsession for muscle cars.

“The first thing he did after he stopped racing was buy muscle car,” Brandi Colangelo said. “I don’t know what’s worse, worrying about him on that bike or worrying about him in that car.”

With the continued support of his family, Colangelo is set to graduate in the spring of 2018. Unsure of where his life will go now that racing isn’t the dream he’s following, he was hopeful for a bright future.

“Things didn’t go as planned for me but I know that somehow I’ll end up back on that track,” Colangelo said.

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USF medical student makes lifelong dream a reality

USFSP student Novonaca Touch fulfills one goal, one a her path to achieving her lifetime dream.
USFSP student Novonaca Touch fulfills one goal, one a her path to achieving her lifetime dream.

Early one spring morning, after taking a biology exam, Novonaca Touch decided to take the Bull Runner home instead of her usual route. She was dropped off in front of her home where she found a white envelope with her name engraved at the top right corner.

She carefully opened the envelope and began to read the letter. Her eyes filled with tears when she saw the words “Congratulations you have been accepted.”

The 22-year-old had applied for Yale School of Medicine during her fall semester at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. She had dreams of attending a prestigious medical school ever since she was a little girl living in Cambodia.

“I never thought in my wildest dreams that something so monumental like this would happen to me” she said. “Throughout my four years in college I have worked extremely hard and it is just a blessing see how it has paid off.”

Touch was born and raised in Kampot, Cambodia. Her family moved to Tampa four years ago.

“I don’t consider myself a foreign exchange student, but I can relate to the culture shock,” she said. “Americans are open and liberal. People from my country, especially women are more reserved and want to live a private society.”

Touch is currently a senior and studying biomedical science. She plans to use her passion for emergency medical care to join Doctors Without Borders.

“I come from a country where medical care is not easily accessible to everyone in need,” Touch said. “My mission in life is to practice medicine in my home town and give back to as any people as possible.”

She has been accepted to numerous graduate medical schools, including USF College of Medicine. She has received scholarships and study aboard opportunities to further her career.

Myra Phal —a relative of Touch— has also graduated from USF, receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Biomedical Science as well.

“I couldn’t be happier for Novonaca,” she said. “She has such a kind heart and loveable personality. I’m going to be a bit broken hearted when she moves out of Tampa, but I know she will make us proud.”

Touch will begin Yale School of Medicine fall semester of 2016. She will be graduating from USF spring 2016.

“Nervous is the only word to describe how I am feeling,” she said. “Yale is not just an ordinary school… it’s kind of a deal here in the states. I really just want to take this journey one step at a time and make my family and other students with the same background proud of my achievements.”

Touch’s younger sister Dara is next in line to attend USF. She hopes to eventually work side-by-side with her sister.

“Novonaca and I have always had a close relationship. It would be awesome to work under her practice,” she said.

Yale School of Medicine has already begun to make Touch feel like part of the community. She has received royal blue and white decorated care packages to match the color of her new school as well as welcoming her to the next chapter in her life.

“2016 is going to be my year,” she said. “I am so grateful to be a positive role model to young women who are working hard to further their education.”

 

USF Tennis Club Attracts Novice and Veteran Players

 

 

Every week, dozens of students take a break from classes and come together to enjoy a sport they love.

The USF Tennis Club has been a part of the sports club program on campus for over 10 years and has reached thousands of students over their time on campus. Whether you have played your whole life, or just started the sport, the tennis club has both a fun and competitive atmosphere to reach all levels of players.

“I’ve played tennis my entire life and I really love the sport. But when high school ended I didn’t think I would be able to play anymore,” said Nicole Viera, a member of the club for 2 years. “But joining the tennis club gave me the opportunity to continue playing in a very competitive atmosphere.”

The club is a completely student-run organization on campus. Every year members vote for officers for the club and training is done by the members themselves, rather than by a coach.

“We strive to make a competitive and social atmosphere for people that enjoy tennis,” said Samad Loa, the Vice President of the club. “Just come out and have some fun, play some games and play some matches.”

The tennis club at USF is one of the school’s most competitive clubs on a national level. The club finished second in the state of Florida last year, and also finished 20th at the national tournament.

“We try to just come out and make some friends that will last a lifetime,” said Loa. “Just enjoy tennis, that’s kind of what our club is all about.”

Dance club brings Argentine tango to USF

 

The Argentine Tango Club at the University of South Florida is bringing the intimate form of the tango to students on campus. Meeting every Tuesday night at the USF Campus Recreation Center, the class is open to both beginners and experienced dancers.

“With Argentine tango, it’s really cool that you’re always dancing with someone so close that’s also really a stranger,” Ryan Mack, Argentine Tango Club president said.

Lessons brought by the club focus on enjoying the experience of the tango, with partner switches and new activities every time.

“I find it one of the classiest dances,” said Miriam Mijares, who has been dancing with the club for over a year. “At the same time, it can be either fun, or formal, passionate, seductive, or just plain silly.”

The tango can be an intimidating dance, especially to students who do not have any experience. However, the club is welcoming to people of all experience levels, regardless if they come with a partner.

“I say close your eyes, pretend like you’re inventing this dance, and according to the music, just do what you feel,” Mijares said.

The club meets in room 033 at 5:00 PM every Tuesday. Admission to the recreation center is free for students and $15 for guests.

Bulls for Kids dances for dollars

William Purkey said, “You’ve gotta dance like there’s nobody watching.” Bulls for Kids President Tiffani Torres and over 1,300 participants embraced dancing for charity during Dance Marathon at the USF Marshall Student Center.

“All the hard work that I’ve done, and all the tears and all the stress is worth it because no matter what I’m going through right now it could be a lot worse,” Torres said. “What I’m going through is making what they’re going through a lot easier.”

Dance Marathon has members shake it for 12 hours while raising money for the All Children’s Hospitals across the country. What began as a small fundraiser 13 years ago has now turned into USF’s largest student-run philanthropy. Dance Marathon has continued to grow with every donation amount higher than the year before.

By the end of the day, Bulls for Kids collected over $130,000. That’s $27,000 more than last year’s record. Torres knows it’s not just about the money. The event’s real purpose comes from the emotional stories of the miracle children.

Alyson Schuch served as the director of family relations and was able to work hands-on with the miracle families throughout the year. Although the donations are great, Schuch said her satisfaction comes from seeing the children’s smiling faces.

“Not everyone realizes the huge impact that we have on the families,” Schuch said. “When they do come and they speak and they give their thanks, it’s like very eye-opening to everyone.”

With such a large total collected this year, Bulls for Kids hopes to raise over $200,000 next year.

Clearwater Comic Con: comics, anime and much more

Clearwater, FL-On March 19 at the Clearwater Public Library, comic and gaming enthusiasts came together for the third annual Clearwater Comic Con. This was a free event for all who attended. There was a myriad of booths and activities that catered to many interests, such as comics, gaming and anime.

The Clearwater Main Library is located at 100 N. Osceola Ave. Within these walls, geeks of all sorts gather to share their passions.
The Clearwater Library is located at 100 N. Osceola Ave. Within these walls, people of all sorts gather to share their passions. By Shelbi Hayes
Outside of the Clearwater Main Library sits the Suncoast Ghost Busters' Ectomobile. This is a modern day replica of the original Ectomobile, or Ecto-1, used in the original Ghost Busters movies.
Outside of the Clearwater Library sits the Suncoast Ghost Busters’ Ectomobile. This is a modern day replica of the original Ectomobile, or Ecto-1, used in the original Ghost Busters movies. By Shelbi Hayes
The 501st Legion, a Star Wars fan group that recreates characters of the series, travels around to conventions. Eden Fraizer, a double-major in physics and dance at the University of Tampa, and Dorothy Harrison, a University of South Florida master's student, cosplay Padme Amidala and a red Storm Trooper.
The 501st Legion, a Star Wars fan group recreates characters of the series, travels around to conventions. Eden Fraizer, a double major in physics and dance at the University of Tampa, and Dorothy Harrison, a University of South Florida master’s student, cosplay Padme Amidala and a red Storm Trooper. By Shelbi Hayes
While fun and games are key to Clearwater Comic Con, Gamers on the Edge brings charity into the main room. GOTE, which has raised over $20,000, holds gaming events in the Tampa Bay area to donate money to local children's hospitals. The gaming group will hold a large tournament to collect more donations on May 15.
While fun and games are key to Clearwater Comic Con, Gamers on the Edge (GOTE) brings charity into the main room. GOTE, which has raised over $20,000, for charity, holds gaming events in the Tampa Bay area to donate money to local children’s hospitals. By Shelbi Hayes
Brian Johnson is a one-man prop-making company out of Clearwater, Fl. His booth showcases his recreations of popular video game weapons as well as customized Nerf guns. "I work 90 hours a week and I'm not sick of it," Johnson said.
Brian Johnson is a one man, prop-making company out of Clearwater, FL. His booth showcases his recreations of popular video game weapons as well as customized Nerf guns. “I work 90 hours a week and I’m not sick of it,” Johnson said. By Shelbi Hayes
Kaitlyn Little showcases her ability to recreate the Borderlands character, Psycho, and stay in character in the final event of the comic con, the cosplay competition. "The voices," Little said when the competition host asked her why she chose this character, a nod to the character's personalty.
Kaitlyn Little showcases her ability to recreate the Borderlands character, Psycho, in the final event of the comic con, the cosplay competition. “The voices,” Little said when asked why she chose this character, was a nod to the character’s personalty. Little took first place. By Shelbi Hayes

Education Abroad makes international study a reality for USF students

Study abroad is an experience that few students are taking advantage of. Approximately 10 percent of undergraduates in the United States study abroad, according to the Institute of International Education.

“It’s such an amazing opportunity that so many students bypass just because of so many common myths like it’s expensive, or it’s not for me, or it’s not for my major,” Chris Haynes, student program coordinator for USF Education Abroad, said. “I feel like if they can come in and talk with me or talk with some of our GloBull Ambassadors who have been there and done that, we can really make this experience a reality. They also see the value in it.”

Education Abroad is working to improve the number of students who study abroad. They have teamed up with USF Career Services to inform people about the benefits.

“For an employer standpoint, we generally look for the whole person,” USF career consultant Doug Meyn said. “Yes, they may have had an internship, yes they may have had study abroad, but more importantly, what do those experiences mean? In other words, on a resume, I don’t like to just see, ‘I did this study abroad.’ OK, what did that mean to you? What did you learn from it? How does that make you a more well-rounded person?”

USF offers a wide variety of programs for its students, with over 100 Education Abroad trips in over 25 countries. Each program’s itinerary has a mix of scheduled activity and free time to explore. The aim is for students to be able to take away a unique cultural experience.

“The whole point is to get students onto the next level, whether that be in their professional careers or in graduate school,” Haynes said. “Study abroad is really a great stepping stone to make their resumes and their applications as competitive as possible. I think that’s something that I hope one day all students consider.”

USF Week: Embracing A Brighter Tomorrow

 

 

Honoring the history of the University of South Florida, and showing school pride is what makes USF Week a special time for students to celebrate.

By having USF Week pay homage to the accomplishments that the institution achieved in its 60 years of service, the college community at USF expects to see 60 more years of prosperity in the future.

“These reasons are what make USF Week so important,” said Athena Bressack, Coordinator of USF’s Center for Student Involvement.

USF Week began as USF Day in 2010, which was declared by former mayor of Tampa Pam Iorio, on April 9. Two years later, the day expanded to a week-long celebration of all things green and gold.

“USF Week is a celebration on what it means to be a Bull,” Bressack said.

USF Week was created by the students, for the students. The planning committee and departments that organize the events during the week, are almost composed of students, staff and volunteers.

USF Week also provides an opportunity for students to meet new people, and learn about their experiences with one another.

During the USF KickOff, students from dozens of organizations, including fraternities, sororities and cultural clubs mingled with one another as two DJs from Bulls Radio were on the ones and twos. One DJ even performed a Caribbean Dancehall, which was infused with electronic dance music to please a mixed crowd.

The Kickoff began on April 4, which includes events like the Working Bulls Bag Breakfast, and the Mr. and Ms. USF Pagent. On Tuesday, Humans of New York photographer Brandon Stanton lectured a packed house of students and community members. USF Week continues until April 9 with a concert, appropriately titled Bullstock, as well as sporting events and a birthday party for USF’s famed mascot, Rocky D. Bull.

Malik Waters, a student assistant in the Center for Student Involvement, said the collaboration of multiple campus partners at USF make the week-long festival a success.

“I make sure that our vendors are paid,” Waters said, as he gestures to an arm full of USF Week wristbands. “Without us, there is no promotional stuff that everyone loves.”

Getting social with the USF brand

Social media has never been more prevalent in college and professional sports than it is today. At the University of South Florida, Mike Farrell is the man behind the computer screen.

“A lot of it is one, developing a voice for our social channels and then two creating content that’s going to engage our fanbase,” Farrell said.

As the Director of Digital Content, Farrell is in charge of churning out vines, tweets, pictures and more across all of USF Athletics’ social media platforms every day.

“One of the things we want to do and want to push is to create stuff that is engaging, stuff that people want to consume, share, retweet and help spread the brand,” Farrell said.

One of the most important days for any athletic department each year is National Signing Day. Student athletes from all over the country officially sign with the school of their choosing. The content created by Farrell and his team made waves on a national level, including an appearance on Yahoo! Sports Dr. Saturday blog.

“This year in particular we had a couple national organizations, blogs, write about some of the things that we did,” Farrell said. “It was a lot of hard work, a lot of people put in a lot, a lot of hours for what’s really just a glorified morning. But I do think that it pays dividends in the end.”

The work Farrell puts in on a daily basis is critical to the growing online presence that is USF Athletics.

“For a large subset of our fans, if you don’t have that presence, you’re irrelevant,” Senior Associate Director of Athletics Andrew Goodrich said.

Even though Farrell is fully focused on the day-to-day task of enhancing USF Athletics’ presence online, he doesn’t lose sight of the big picture.

“When one person leaves, somebody else can come in and there’s no drop,” Farrell said. “That’s the USF brand. That’s the USF Athletics brand. That’s the USF football brand. There’s no change. That needs to be a constant.”

 

 

 

USF Oracle finds way to coexist with the online world

Print is not dying for The Oracle, USF’s independent student-run newspaper. It is evolving.

The paper has reduced their publication days from four times a week to two. Multimedia editor Adam Mathieu said the staff has to remain quick when delivering the news, but he felt relieved to print less frequently.

“We don’t have to worry about having a print product out by 12:30 (a.m.) four days a week,” Mathieu said.

Grace Hoyte, the editor-in-chief during the change, published a letter to the readers in December. In it, she wrote The Oracle “must accept” that readers are turning online for their news.

“The Oracle welcomes students from all majors to contribute,” she added, “and with a greater online presence, we will remain a forum for diverse voices and opinions.”

One of those areas includes social media. The newspaper’s sports section Twitter account conducted a poll in March to survey how their followers received from The Oracle. While print edged out the website option by five percentage points, 61 percent of those who responded said they received information through social media.

“We’re seeing more people comment and more posts shared. Just a very active Facebook account,” Mathieu said. “And then active hits on our website and more people heading to the website.”

While the new schedule reduces the quantity of newspapers circulated each week, Matthieu said the amount printed for each day remains unchanged at 8,000.

Not everyone settled in with the switch when they first found out. Sports editor Jacob Hoag said he liked being able to read the news on a physical copy.

“I wasn’t too happy with it,” Hoag said. “I thought it was going to hurt our production but it really hasn’t. We can do more feature stories in the paper and more hard news online.”