Riverfront Park asset to students

The University of South Florida Riverfront Park offers a unique experience to its students and alumni by providing outdoor recreational activities from canoeing to even a ropes course.

With the advantage Florida brings to its residents, USF is able to offer its students and alumni a place to de-stress and relax after a hard day at work or from studying. The park has a wide range of activities available. The ropes course is a common favorite among it students and is an activity many people have never done before.

“I take them up on the ropes course which is about 55 feet high and they go through obstacles and stuff and they eventually zip line down,” ropes course facilitator Hunter Mitchell said.

The park is also on the banks of the Hillsborough River, allowing the park to offer canoeing and kayaking to its visitors. Many times, canoeing and kayaking is very expensive to go out and experience. At Riverfront Park students can rent canoes and kayaks from $5 to $10 and a full usage pass for $45.

“At USF Riverfront Boat House, we provide students the opportunity to rent out kayaks, single-person kayaks, two-person kayaks and canoes,” boat house facilitator Esteban Baute said.

The park also offers team-building activities that help USF students build leadership skills and make new friends.

“It gets people talking in case they don’t know each other and we just really establish trust and communication and really get groups closer together after they come out here,” Mitchell said.

With over 49,000 students at USF, making friends can be tough. USF Riverfront Park allows students to make new friends easier and bring different people together by offering these activities.

USF Sport Clubs: A chance to play

Sport Clubs at the University of South Florida offer students the chance to be able to live out their sports dreams of being college athletes, but not necessarily playing at the Division 1 level.

 

“This way students that are not at as high a level as NCAA athletes, still have an environment where they can go out and have fun and participate in their sport of choice.” Supervisor Sam Cathcart said.

 

USF Sports Clubs offers many different types of sports to USF students. They also offer unique sports including Water polo, Quidditch, and even Kendo. The wide range of sports available allows many different students to get involved with the sports clubs.

 

Also, many students who play sports during high school assume they are going to play sports in college and are often disappointed when they try out for the college team and do not make the cut.  USF Sport Clubs allows these students to still be able to play the sports they loved back in high school. Club teams are often much more laid back than college teams allowing the players to enjoy their time more while they are playing.

 

Students are also able to create their own clubs if they wish to do so. “There’s Bullsync that you can go onto if you are interested in joining a sports club. That has all the information,” Jordan Mckenzie of USF Campus Recreation said. “As well as how to join a club. If you want to start a new club you are able to go on Bullsync and that’ll answer your questions as well.”

 

USF Sport Clubs give a unique future to something many students thought they would never be able to do again.

 

Mini Doughnut Factory Celebrates First Birthday

Mini Doughnut Factory Turns One

Tampa — They may be tiny, but they are the hottest shop on the block. The Mini Doughnut Factory is celebrating their one-year anniversary and the Tampa Bay community couldn’t be happier.

“I’m a regular customer, I come here all the time,” says customer Geena Casey, “I’m so happy for them reaching their one year anniversary.”

This is the first retail location in the country that specializes in gourmet miniature doughnuts.

The owners thought of the idea a few years prior to opening the factory but since it’s opening, they never looked back. In fact, they have plans to open another store in St. Petersburg in the beginning of 2017.

“Pat and Zee had the idea for about three years and just decided to go for it and now they are about to open another store,” employee Kayleigh Frank tells us.

Saturday and Sunday are when you will most likely notice a line wrapped around the building on South Dale Mabry Highway, and while this makes employees like Frank very busy, this makes the owners, Pat and Zee, extremely happy.

“The weekends are definitely the busiest but it just means we are getting more business so I can’t complain,” Frank says.

From bacon to Pop Rocks to Sriracha hot sauce, the toppings at the factory are endless.

For more information on the Mini Doughnut Factory, including store hours, head to their Facebook page here, https://www.facebook.com/minidoughnutfactory/.

Immigration Under Trump Administration

As the American people prepare for the upcoming election, many are excited about playing a part in the democratic process. But for others, like first generation Mexican-American Paloma Narvaez, each day closer to the election is potentially one less she could have with her family and friends.
There has been a lot of discussion on both sides about Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s proposed plan to combat people entering the country illegally. Many people, like Narvaez, who are close with numerous undocumented people in the U.S., fear for the future of the nation if Trump’s plans are put in place.
Narvaez spoke of a friend of hers, an undocumented graduate student at USF conducting research in chemistry.
“She can get deported when she’s doing so much good here,” the junior accounting major said. “How are we going to lose someone so valuable?”
Trump’s plan on his website includes building a massive border wall on the southern border of the United States, extreme vetting for entrance into the country and the ending of sanctuary cities. The majority of Americans who oppose Trump’s proposals believe they are unethical and go against what America stands for. However, Trump’s supporters believe his plan will be a way to crack down on crime and aid in the safety of our nation in the future.
Michael Varicak, a USF alumnus with a degree in business, said he has been a Trump supporter since the day he announced his candidacy. Although he is an independent voter, Varicak said Trump’s “lack of a Washington, D.C. filter” got him listening to what Trump had to say.
Varicak said in a phone interview that he believes the immigration process has to be reformed. He also said he believes that although Trump may not build the massive wall he has been describing, he will definitely strengthen border security as a whole.
“I don’t think it’s unethical to enforce a country’s boarders and security,” the recent USF graduate said. “Especially at a time when you have ISIS and other things going on.”
The most talked about aspect of Trump’s plan is building a border wall, and making Mexico pay for it. David Jacobson, Ph.D., a USF professor and expert on immigration, said he doesn’t foresee the wall happening as Trump has described to his supporters.
Jacobson said although putting up a wall is legal, it would be nearly impossible to get another country to pay for it without using coercive measures. Jacobson pointed out that these tactics would pose issues, especially since the two nations are so close.
Since Jacobson doesn’t see Mexico paying for the wall in any way, he added that if the U.S. were to undertake this task alone, it would be a giant expense.
“It would be an enormous cost,” Jacobson said. “It would involve a massive investment, so it’s not really feasible.”
Originally, another pillar of Trump’s plan was mass deportations of undocumented people in the United States as soon as he went into office. Jacobson said mass deportation would not work on a logistical or legal level.
“That’s not really practical to deport 11 million people,” Jacobson said. “Each individual has a right to due process. It just becomes much more complex to even think about that.”
Although Trump has softened his stance on that in recent months, Narvaez said many in her community and family do not believe his change of heart.
“The way he portrayed himself initially, we already know he has that bias,” Narvaez said. “What has changed from then to now to change his stance?”
Narvaez and her family have a lot riding on this election. The outcome will likely determine whether many of her family members can stay in America, or will be forced back to the small Mexican town of Mazamitla, the name of which she has tattooed across her forearm.
Narvaez said regardless of what Trump says or does going forward, she will never respect him after his comments claiming that Mexican immigrants are bringing drugs and crime to the U.S. at the start of his presidential campaign.
“That’s my family he’s talking about,” Narvaez said. “Those are people I work with and study with.”

Brickworld event in Tampa sparks creativity

Tampa Fla.— Brickworld Tampa, a convention of LEGO creations, held a 2-day event at the Florida State Fairgrounds throughout the weekend of November 19.

Brickworld is a convention of LEGO creations brought to cities around the United States to be put on display by their creators.

“The whole reason we started Brickworld was education and inspiration” Bryan Bonahoom, the execute director of Brickworld, said.

Bonahoom has been a part of the convention for 10 years. Other than providing a way for fans to experience creating, Brickworld is also involved in the community through holding auctions and donating money to multiple charities.

“We typically raise about $25,000 on this Friday night event each year at our show in Chicago,” Bonahoom said.

A few of the charities they donate to include FIRST LEGO League, The Riley Children’s Hospital, Creations for Charity and Make-a-Wish.

Hundreds of creations were on display for the community to visit, and shops were set up throughout the convention selling LEGOs to build. One of the more popular displays this year was a 26-foot-long model of the USS Missouri WWII battleship.

Vera Anjo, a retired teacher, believes that building these creations is a way to keep her sharp and allows her to interact with people.

“Life is never static,” Anjo said.

 

Edited by: Samantha Nieto

Radio show helps fight hunger

99.5 WQYK partnered up with Feeding Tampa Bay for the fourth year in a row to collect food for those in need in Zephyrhills on Friday.

The country music station is in the middle of their event known as Food Fund November. Every Friday of the month, the morning show broadcasts live from a city in the Tampa Bay area. Their tent is set up right next to Feeding Tampa Bay’s tent, where you can drop off food for donation.

“We started Food Fund Friday’s as a way to both help families and to get out to the community to say thanks for everything that you do,” Veronica Alfaro, co-host of the morning show said.

Roughly 100 people showed up to donate food. Among those was state Rep. Danny Burgess, who donated food and participated in the radio show.

“The community always turns out for these type of events,” Burgess said. “We’re always looking for ways to help our neighbors and to help others.”

Unfortunately, those in need are suffering throughout the year, not just during the fall. For this reason, Feeding Tampa Bay wants people to know that their services are available year-round.

“Fall is when people tend to focus on people being hungry,” Maxine Rice, a Feeding Tampa Bay employee said. “But really we need to make sure people are aware throughout the year.”

Feeding Tampa Bay is part of the national Feeding America network. Over the last three years, the nonprofit organization has nearly doubled the amount of food that is provided to the public. They went from 20 million meals to 37 million meals a year.

If you want to reach out and help your community, you can go online to Feeding Tampa Bay’s website at feedingtampabay.org to learn more.

Author of “The Selfie Vote” Speaks Out About 2016 Presidential Election

Author and Republican pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson stopped by to talk about polling, millennials, and what could seemingly be labeled the most interesting election yet. Here is her seven second take:

* Click *

Second 1: Anderson is a millennial herself, though she is hesitant to admit it. She carefully placed space between her age and ours while she spoke. Anderson never anticipated falling into her current line of work. A graduate thesis and a passion for Washington D.C. put her on the path of polling, political contributing, and a book deal among other endeavors. A strong voice for the millennial generation.

Second 2: As for her take on young voters, they care more than you think. Anderson recalled comments made that millennials are unreachable when it comes to politics. For Anderson these comments do not ring true. Instead she sees 80 million millennials, one force that can reshape an election.

Second 3: So how does one reach these lucrative voters? Anderson does not think that the Democratic party has hit the nail on the head just yet, frustrated with the Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton campaign. Anderson referenced her frustration in the article Stop trying to make Chillary Happen. She recalled Clinton’s requests for young voters to “Pokémon Go to the polls” and explain how their student debt made them feel in three emojis or less. Anderson’s advice to Clinton:

“Quit trying so hard,” Anderson said. “Just be yourself.”

Second 4: As for the Republican nominee Donald Trump’s efforts, Anderson considered them to be either non-existent or counterproductive. Though, she did give a nod to Trump for being the more technologically savvy out of the two.

“The medium does not trump the message,” Anderson said. “No pun intended.”

Second 5: So how do the candidates tip the scale and reign in the millennial vote this year? Speak to young voters at the level they are currently at. According to Anderson, this includes understanding their moral lens, distrust of big institutions, adversity to labels and pragmatism.

Second 6: The real question is what does this election come down to? For Anderson, it is numbers and certain states. Trump needs 269 electoral votes to push the decision to the House of Representatives. This is easier said than done according to Anderson’s analysis.

“Trump needs everything to go right in that one narrow path to win,” Anderson said.

Second 7: In the end, Anderson is optimistic that Trump will not win this election cycle.

“Democrats fall in love,” Anderson said. “Republicans fall in line.”

Clinton does not have an easy fight either in Anderson’s eyes.

“Young women are not giving bonus points based on someone’s gender,” Anderson said.

This year’s election is up in the air, causing Anderson’s closing statement to never ring more true:

“Your vote matters.”

Local Organization Inspires Young Girls

The Centre for Girls is a youth organization aimed at girls from ages 5 to 14. It is led by Sartura Shuman-Smith, the center’s program director. The center is also organized by program manager, Walter Jennings.

“This place is so therapeutic and so healing for me,” Shuman-Smith said. “It is just so important for me to know I have a purpose.”

When asked about the focus of the Centre for Girls, Shuman-Smith said, “We’re not creating girls or enhancing girls, we are creating women and developing women.” She talked about the accounting classes, dance instruction, as well as a Lego program for the young women ages five to nine.

Walter Jennings, the program manager, is in charge of after-school help, as well as developing a curriculum for all of the girls attending.

“Our heart’s passion and desire is for young people to come up with good, constructive ways to deal with some of the issues and challenges that they have,” Jennings said. He talked about how his girls attended the center and how much he feels he owes the organization.

The Centre for Girls is located on 105 W. Sligh Avenue and serves an enrichment program for girls ages 5 to 14. The program is not free, although the website offers program assistance. There are currently 46 girls attending the center.

Clinton celebrates 69th birthday at rally in Tampa

Hillary Clinton spent her 69th birthday on the campaign trail in Florida, attending rallies in both Lake Worth and Tampa. Early voting began on Monday in the state, causing both major party nominees to return to encourage supporters to show up to the polls.

The rally included guest appearances from Mayor Bob Buckhorn, Congresswoman Kathy Castor and Academy Award nominee Angela Bassett. All speakers emphasized the necessity of early voting and the weight the swing state holds in the general election.

Supporters let out a cheer as Hillary Clinton took the stage to speak at her rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park in Tampa on Wednesday. By Breanne Williams
Supporters let out a cheer as Hillary Clinton took the stage to speak at her rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park in Tampa on Wednesday. By Breanne Williams
Congresswoman Kathy Castor spoke prior to Clinton taking the stage encouraging attendees to vote early at one of the many polling locations in the area, which she reminded voters are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Nov. 5. “Everyday is Election Day here in Hillsborough County.” By Breanne Williams
Congresswoman Kathy Castor spoke prior to Clinton taking the stage encouraging attendees to vote early at one of the many polling locations in the area, which she reminded voters are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Nov. 5. “Everyday is Election Day here in Hillsborough County,” Castor said. By Breanne Williams
Secret Service agents lined the Tampa Museum of Art and other surrounding buildings in preparation for Clinton’s arrival at the rally. By Breanne Williams
Secret Service agents lined the Tampa Museum of Art and other surrounding buildings in preparation for Clinton’s arrival at the rally. By Breanne Williams
“We’ve actually learned in this campaign that Donald Trump is the poster boy for everything wrong with our economy,” said Clinton. She then detailed her plans to boost the nation’s and Tampa’s economy, including promising to give the high-speed rail rejected by Rick Scott in 2011 another look. By Breanne Williams
“We’ve actually learned in this campaign that Donald Trump is the poster boy for everything wrong with our economy,” Clinton said. She then detailed her plans to boost the nation’s and Tampa’s economy, including promising to give the high-speed rail rejected by Rick Scott in 2011 another look. By Breanne Williams
Many supporters brought signs and flowers for Clinton as the rally was held on her 69th birthday. The crowd sang happy birthday to the nominee both before the rally began and after its conclusion when she shook hands with many in attendance. By Breanne Williams
Many supporters brought signs and flowers for Clinton as the rally was held on her 69th birthday. The crowd sang happy birthday to the nominee both before the rally began and after its conclusion when she shook hands with many in attendance. By Breanne Williams
Secret Service lined the barricades separating the public from Clinton, where thousands attended to celebrate the nominee’s 69th birthday and hear her plans for boosting the economy, making college affordable and continuing the fight for women’s rights. By Breanne Williams
Secret Service lined the barricades separating the public from Clinton, where thousands attended to celebrate the nominee’s 69th birthday and hear her plans for boosting the economy, making college affordable and continuing the fight for women’s rights. By Breanne Williams
Sarah Gaines, an organizer often found on the USF campus, signed up volunteers both prior and following the rally. Both the organizers and Castor encouraged attendees to remain active in the last stretch of the election by knocking on doors and making calls for the Clinton campaign. By Breanne Williams
Sarah Gaines, an organizer often found on the USF campus, signed up volunteers both prior and following the rally. Both the organizers and Castor encouraged attendees to remain active in the last stretch of the election by knocking on doors and making calls for the Clinton campaign. By Breanne Williams
Protesters who were both pro-Trump and third party camped outside the entrance. Thomas Ciotola, a Gary Johnson supporter, protested the Tampa rallies this week for both major party candidates. “I don’t think there’s anyway to choose between the two," Ciotola said. “That’s like asking, ‘Who’s better? Hitler or Stalin?’” By Breanne Williams
Protesters who were both pro-Trump and third party camped outside the entrance. Thomas Ciotola, a Gary Johnson supporter, protested the Tampa rallies this week for both major party candidates. “I don’t think there’s anyway to choose between the two,” Ciotola said. “That’s like asking, ‘Who’s better? Hitler or Stalin?’” By Breanne Williams