Florida Focus News Brief March 24, 2016

In this episode of Florida Focus: Governor Scott signs a bill for rape kit testing; five people are on the loose after robbing a Sprint store; a wrong-way driver was intercepted in Hillsborough County; Tampa is ranked as the fifteenth worst region for traffic congestion; a new people mover is coming to Tampa International Airport.

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Florida Focus News Brief March. 22, 2016

In this Episode: Rays take on Cuba’s National Team, Residents survive a apartment fire, a drunk driver causes large damages at a gas station, an online swap shop meeting goes bad, and new events for Tampa’s art and culture scene.

 

 

 

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‪#‎RaysinCuba‬ ‪#‎ApartmentFire‬ ‪#‎DrunkDriving‬ ‪#‎Shooting‬ ‪#‎ArtsandCulture‬

Florida Focus News Brief March 21, 2016

In this episode: a Sarasota crash leaves three dead and one hospitalized; dash-cam video of yesterday’s I-275 wrong-way driver released; Florida gas prices have increased 29 cents in the last 20 days; and wives and girlfriends of the Tampa Bay Lightning are hosting a philanthropic fashion show.

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Florida Focus News Brief March 30, 2016

In this episode a sink hole forces Tarpon Spring residents from their homes; a spice bust takes place in Hillsborough County; Raymond James Stadium undergoes renovations; Amazon’s Ruskin location opens today; and the Gasparilla International Film Festival kicks off tonight.

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Florida Focus News Brief March 29, 2016

In this episode a tanker leaves one person dead and 1-75 closed for hours; Wawa is seeking to hire thousands of workers in six states; One-hundred-fifty-five Pinellas students will receive college scholarships tomorrow; and The Straz Center plans on expanding onto the Hillsborough River.

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Schoenfeld relieves with running

Running between the crowds of cheering families and friends at Epcot, Steven Schoenfeld kicked it into high gear as he approached the finish line, completing his second marathon this past January.

Schoenfeld, a sophomore at the University of South Florida, ran track competitively throughout high school, but was forced to stop before beginning college due to a minor knee injury which restricted his abilities.

With a desire to keep running, despite no longer competing, Schoenfeld signed up for a marathon and began to train himself.

“When I realized I couldn’t compete anymore, I just knew I had to do something that would keep me running,” said Schoenfeld. “Training for marathons gives me a reason to keep going and just makes me feel more connected to running.”

The marathon that Schoenfeld trains for is the Walt Disney World Marathon which is held every January. During this marathon, participants run 26.2 miles through all four Disney parks.

“I’ve been going to Disney all my life, so it’s awesome doing what I love at the parks I grew up going to,” said Schoenfeld. “It’s motivating seeing the different Disney characters cheering you on throughout the marathon.”

On top of training for marathons, Schoenfeld is an electrical engineering major at USF who is dedicated to his studies. He is also actively involved in band and Phi Mu Alpha, a social music fraternity.

“Ever since I can remember, I have been extremely involved in school,” said Schoenfeld.

Being involved in so many different activities and having a rigorous major tends to leave Schoenfeld feeling extremely stressed. Running is what Schoenfeld uses to disconnect from the strenuous lifestyle of academics and student life.

“There are days where I just know that I’ll be spending my night studying at the library,” said Schoenfeld. “I turn to running for stress relief because when I run, all I think about is the road ahead of me and not about any of my problems.”

When training for marathons, it is extremely crucial to have the support of both family and friends. Keegan Wertz, Schoenfeld’s little brother in Phi Mu Alpha, was extremely supportive during the training process and stood by to cheer Shcoenfeld during the marathon.

“I woke up at an ungodly hour of the morning to see Steven off on the day of his marathon and provide him with emotional support,” said Wertz. “I was also there to cheer him on from the sidelines as he crossed the finish line at Epcot. I couldn’t have been happier for him because I knew it was something he had been training and working extremely hard for.”

Schoenfeld also receives praise and respect for how well he manages to balance training, studying and staying involved.

His roommate, Justin Mouriz, has watched him grow as a person since he began college and admires his work ethic.

“The amount of work that Steven has put in for his marathons is unbelievable,” said Mouriz. “I can remember several days that he ran over 13 miles to keep his endurance up, and then took part in several activities for different organizations afterwards. All in all, Steven puts in a lot of work into all he does.”

School may be getting more rigorous and time consuming for Schoenfeld, but that is not stopping him from training for his next marathon in January 2017.

“It gets really hard to manage my time between training for a marathon and keeping up with school,” said Schoenfeld. “None of the struggles I go through before the marathon matter once I cross that finish line. It truly is the best feeling in the world.”

With the continued support of his friends and family, Schoenfeld eventually plans on running in a, iron man triathlon which consists of biking, swimming and running.

“Staying active is extremely important to me and I am always thinking of ways to challenge myself,” said Schoenfeld. “An iron man triathlon sounds like the ultimate challenge and I cannot wait to take that on.”

Different perspectives on USF’s Tobacco and Smoke Free Policy

USF has implemented a new Tobacco and Smoking Free Policy. Tobacco and smoking are now prohibited from the Tampa campus, which means that the university’s 24 designated smoking areas no longer exist.

“USF made this change because the university is committed to providing a healthy and safe environment for people to learn in and for people to work in,” USF media and public affairs manager, Adam Freeman, said. “By going tobacco and smoke free for the entire campus, we’re hoping to promote a healthy lifestyle and a lifestyle built around wellness for all members of the community.”

The policy went into effect Jan. 4 before the spring semester started. The university is aiming for the policy to be peer enforced. This can be done by asking people who are smoking to stop or by contacting the building manager nearest to where the smoking is taking place. Students caught smoking can be taken to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities to face disciplinary action. Staff and faculty can be brought before their supervisors. However, the consequences do not seem to be a deterrent.

“I think that it’s definitely a good idea, absolutely,” USF junior Nick Salsone said. “I see that a lot of people don’t follow the rules, but I think that they should.”

There are still plenty of people smoking on campus. The word “free” was scratched off of one of the tobacco and smoke free campus signs.

“I think if people want to smoke, they should be able to,” sophomore Madeline McKeever said. “People are going to do it regardless, so the signs don’t really stop anyone.”

USF’s St. Petersburg and Sarasota campuses already have tobacco free policies. USF Tampa has been working towards a tobacco free campus for the past four years.

Getting social with the USF brand

Social media has never been more prevalent in college and professional sports than it is today. At the University of South Florida, Mike Farrell is the man behind the computer screen.

“A lot of it is one, developing a voice for our social channels and then two creating content that’s going to engage our fanbase,” Farrell said.

As the Director of Digital Content, Farrell is in charge of churning out vines, tweets, pictures and more across all of USF Athletics’ social media platforms every day.

“One of the things we want to do and want to push is to create stuff that is engaging, stuff that people want to consume, share, retweet and help spread the brand,” Farrell said.

One of the most important days for any athletic department each year is National Signing Day. Student athletes from all over the country officially sign with the school of their choosing. The content created by Farrell and his team made waves on a national level, including an appearance on Yahoo! Sports Dr. Saturday blog.

“This year in particular we had a couple national organizations, blogs, write about some of the things that we did,” Farrell said. “It was a lot of hard work, a lot of people put in a lot, a lot of hours for what’s really just a glorified morning. But I do think that it pays dividends in the end.”

The work Farrell puts in on a daily basis is critical to the growing online presence that is USF Athletics.

“For a large subset of our fans, if you don’t have that presence, you’re irrelevant,” Senior Associate Director of Athletics Andrew Goodrich said.

Even though Farrell is fully focused on the day-to-day task of enhancing USF Athletics’ presence online, he doesn’t lose sight of the big picture.

“When one person leaves, somebody else can come in and there’s no drop,” Farrell said. “That’s the USF brand. That’s the USF Athletics brand. That’s the USF football brand. There’s no change. That needs to be a constant.”