The Tampa Museum Features Who Shot Sports

The Tampa Museum of Art holds a special exhibition each moth that is dedicated to a unique topic. This month it’s Sports.

Who Shot Sports is a nine-section exhibition that contains over 200 sports photography. Each photograph included in the exhibition is accompanied by the history of the photographer behind the lens. Joanna Robotham, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, says that Who Shot Sports pays homage to the creative memories captured through the photo lens.

“It looks at not just the famous moments in art history but looks at who the photographers are beyond the screen. The whole premise behind Who Shot Sports is to give the photographers recognition and identity. Many people know the famous photographs but they don’t know who took it,” said Robotham.

The Tampa Bay area is a city that encompasses many sports teams and media outlets. Robotham and the Tampa Museum of Art decided to include Lens of Tampa Bay Sports, in order to showcase the sports versatility that the city holds.

“We worked with eight different photographers and pulled about fifty photographs of local sports teams and included that in a smaller show. So, it’s a nice companion to the larger show,”said Robotham.

The overall functionality of photography allows for individuals to emerge creativity with reality. Tatyannah George, a student photographer, says that her passion is driven by the ability to capture the beauty of the moment.

“As a student photography I would say that being able to capture everyday lives for people outside of events or things of that nature is a beautiful thing because you are able to give that moment or experience outside of actually being there,” said George.

Who Shot Sports can be viewed until April 30th.

Minority women’s golfing group looks to bridge gap in professional world.

After leaving the corporate office one woman made the decision to build Women of Color Golf, an organization centered on golf and networking.

The organization’s founder and director, Clemmie Perry, made it her duty to increase the awareness of golf within the minority women community.

Women of Color Golf (WOCG) is a non-profit organization that sets out to promote and encourage minorities and women of color to learn the benefits of golf. Ms. Perry not only wants women to fundamentally understand the game of golf, but she also wants Women of Color Golf to be a gateway to networking and partnerships.

“We serve on various boards, such as the World Golf Foundation and other organizations that will help leverage our mission,” said Perry.

Many women within this organization have benefited from the outlets that Women of Color Golf provides. Robyn Thompson, the Millennial Leader for WOCG, says that this organization is the needed push to bridge the gap between male and female golfers.

“I think we have to educate women, and that’s one of the great things about Women of Color Golf. In the beginner session they basically educate you on what golf is, how you play the game before you even go out on the golf course,” said Thompson.

Perry has built an organization that is more than just “learning how to play golf.” Women of Color Golf has been national recognized by President Barack Obama for the diligence that it provides to the Tampa Bay area. There is hope for further expansion and an excitement for future endeavors.

Small Berries, Big Punch

A pharmacist at the University of South Florida demonstrates the power of blueberries.

Starting in 2001, Dr. Paula Bickford along with her colleague set out to reveal the ultimate antioxidant properties that blueberries contain. Bickford, Ph.D. in pharmacology, proves that this fruit is the hidden secret to perfect aging and adaptive brain memory.

“We were first looking at a number of different fruits and vegetables. A colleague of mine, who works at the USDA, had categorized twenty or so different fruits and vegetables for the antioxidant capacity. Blueberries come up pretty near the top,” Bickford said.

Once fully understanding the potential of the fruit, Bickford began to discover other properties of blueberries. She studied dozens of potential ingredients that could effectively combine with blueberries and enhance certain mechanisms of the body, such as fight damaging inflammation and promote new cell growth.

“When we combine the blueberries and the green tea plus the other ingredients we were actually able to boost the activity of each of the individuals, so that the activity of the individual is more than the sum of the part,” Bickford said.

Through her research, Bickford concluded that blueberries are more than just the fruit that one blends in their smoothie. This impactful fruit is an added support system or a “Band-Aid for the body” that anyone can benefit from.