Local Café Offers Food For Some, Hope For Others

 

Inside the Box Café and Catering is a social enterprise of the Metropolitan Ministries, providing both vocational training and opportunities for work experience to the less fortunate.

Chef Cliff Barsi founded the culinary school program to help individuals transitioning out of homelessness and poverty learn their trade. The kitchen at Metropolitan Ministries is their classroom, and Inside the Box Café is their training ground.

“The reason we started Inside the Box Café is because I wanted a real life restaurant for them to work in,” Barsi said. “They go out to the cafés, they work on the line with the cooks there so they get that skill of urgency-something that you just don’t learn in a normal culinary school. Then, they go back to the kitchen and they do some practical cooking classes with our chef.”

The 16-week program is funded by JP Morgan Chase Bank. All students that are accepted into the program receive a full scholarship.

Eliu DeLeon is one of those students, preparing to graduate. DeLeon hopes to become a chef at a fine dining restaurant upon leaving Inside the Box.

“A lot of my peers that have already graduated have ended up in a lot of fine dining companies,” DeLeon said.

Chely Figueroa is the catering coordinator at Inside the Box. Before that, though, she had become homeless in 2009.

“I found myself walking 18 miles to this place here, Metropolitan Ministries, to find a safe haven,” Figueroa said.

Barsi called her one day, asking her to run the downtown storefront.

All proceeds from Inside the Box Café and Catering go directly back to Metropolitan Ministries to help others in need.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting The Biscuit Bar In Tampa

 

Kathryn Fulmer is a culinary school graduate who turned her childhood dream into a reality with her handmade biscuits.

Bayshore Biscuit Company, opened in November 2016, is a catering company that specializes in “biscuit bars.” The biscuit bars offer a unique catering experience to consumers, with the biscuit being the center of attention.

“You can give someone a biscuit but if you have the whole spread like a biscuit bar and you’re able to customize it with fried chicken, pimento cheese, sausage gravy. Really the options are endless” Fulmer said. “It gives a new experience and a new life to the biscuit that people maybe didn’t always think about.”

Fulmer’s passion for making biscuits started in her grandmother’s kitchen when she was only 10 years old. Throughout the years, she has perfected her recipe.

“Biscuits as simple as they are, can be quite complex because the littlest measurement off of your ingredients can really throw off the recipe,” Fulmer said.

In early March, Bayshore Biscuit Company was a first-time participant in the Hyde Park Market in Tampa, Florida. All 250 biscuits sold out in only three hours.

“The strawberry biscuit was the best I ever had,” Michael Raphaely said, a first-time customer.

Fulmer plans to continue to participate in local markets, but she also wants to focus on the catering experience that Bayshore Biscuit Company has to offer.

“It’s different, but people love it,” Fulmer said. “People love different foods. So I’m really hoping to grow the catering side of the business and really give people an experience that they won’t forget.”

If you’re interested in having a biscuit bar at your next event, you can visit www.bbiscuitco.com for catering information. Bayshore Biscuit Company is also on Facebook and Instagram where you can find information on upcoming markets.

 

 

Misleading Labels on Healthy Snacks in Vending Machines

When choosing a snack from the vending machine you may only pay attention to labels on the front of the package; make sure to not let certain labels fool you into thinking you’re eating healthy.

Vending machines have made an effort to partake in the healthy transformation of food offered on college campuses. Snacks that are below 250 calories are now labeled with a green sticker.

There are also “2bu” vending machines, which are advertised as only being filled with healthy snacks.

Many people may think they are eating healthy if they choose a snack that is labeled organic, gluten free, natural or fat free.

Registered Dietitian Dr. Theresa Crocker said “labeling as a whole often misleads consumers.”

“Just because something is labeled organic or natural, doesn’t mean it’s healthy. But if instead, you set standards that all of the components in a vending machine meet XYZ standards then it’s guaranteed that people have access to healthier foods,” said Dr. Crocker.

James Thach, a student at the University of South Florida, has fallen victim of the misleading labels.

“If I saw something that was organic, I would assume that it would be a lot healthier than something that wasn’t,” said Thach.

Unfortunately, this is not the case. The “2bu” vending machine offers a selection of organic options, including organic jellybeans. One package of these jellybeans has 58 grams of sugar. That is double the amount of sugar than a Twix candy bar, which has 28 grams of sugar per bar.

Although these snacks may not be mislabeled, the labels can be misleading. The nutrition facts will reveal more about what you’re eating than the labels on the front of the package.