USF women learn the ins and outs of Bulls football

The fourth USF Women’s Football Clinic was held on Saturday. There were over thirty women who showed up at 9:00 A.M. when the event kicked off. The clinic had many different phases throughout the day.

“In the morning we started upstairs in our team room,” says Executive Assistant Julia Reed, “We broke down offense, defense and special teams. We just broke it down. What is football? What does behind the scenes look like?”

After a morning filled with Q&A sessions with the wives of coaches and the players, there was a 50/50 raffle and a silent action. Some of the prizes included a signed football helmet by USF head football coach Willy Taggart, t-shirts and more.

The afternoon was more hands on, with the ladies going down to the practice field. They were put through the same drills that the players do on a daily basis. These drills helped teach the ladies the importance of throwing accuracy, footwork, proper technique of tackling and more.

USF President Judy Genshaft also attended the event.

“Today was double wonderful because we had the women’s football clinic this morning and later this afternoon is our spring game,” said Genshaft.

After the woman’s clinic was over, the men played their annual football spring game.

 

DJ turned USF professor keeping podcasting alive

In February of 2015, WMNF Tampa brought in a man with decades of experience to be their general manger. The man is Craig Kopp and he has been working in radio and news stations since graduating from Bowling Green University. WMNF is a little old fashion, it holds thousands of CD’s and records within their walls.

“We have one of the largest record and CD collections available in the country,” says Kopp. “Other radio stations are using computers, but I like this option because people may see an album they have not heard in years and want to listen to that.”

Kopp is not just managing the radio station, he is also on air with his podcast Everyday Ethics. He hosts the podcast with Kelly McBride, from the Poynter Institute, and discusses a wide range of topics. The topics range from breastfeeding in pubic to the Zika Virus.

As if that doesn’t sound like enough of a workload, Kopp started teaching at the University of South Florida this past spring. He is teaching a podcasting class. During the semester, Kopp shows the students how to record and edit the podcast, as well as prepare for asking the right questions during the interview.

Chuck Muller is a student at USF and really enjoys Kopp’s teaching methods.

“Professor Kopp has a very interesting way of teaching,” Muller said. “You think that you’re just recording a podcast, but he really emphasizes the prep work that goes into writing your questions and not necessarily sticking to the script during the interview.”

Kopp, who is 64-years-old, has no plans on retiring. He wants to continue working until he physically can’t anymore. “Why would I want to stop doing what I love? Kopp said.

 

Local YMCA program helps fight Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a brain illness that has four main symptoms. The four main symptoms of the disease are trembling, limb stiffness, impaired balance and slowness of movement. There is a program available at a local YMCA that can help reduce some of those symptoms.

The program is called Pedaling for Parkinson’s, and it aims to help improve the motor functions of people with Parkinson’s disease. The program’s website states its three goals.

The first goal is to improve the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients and their caregivers. The program’s second goal is to educate patients, caregivers and the general public about the benefits of maintaining an active lifestyle after a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis. The third goal is to support research dedicated to the prevention and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

Pedaling for Parkinson’s is available every Tuesday and Thursday at 10:15 a.m. at the South Tampa YMCA. The class consists of a 10-minute warmup, 40 minutes of work and a 10-minute cooldown.

Melissa Brockman is a group coordinator for the class. The class is more than just riding a stationary bike twice a week, she said..

“We actually put the bikes in a circle so that there’s lots of cross-talking,” Brockman said. “It is a very social environment, which is very beneficial for some folks that are suffering from depression or mood disorders.”

Dave Lapides was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2008. He is a new participant in the class, and his favorite part of the class is getting the chance to interact with others.

“I’ve got an exercise bike at home, but this gets me out and meeting people,” Lapides said.

Contact the South Tampa YMCA if you are interested in more information about the class.

USF architecture students help create real-world solutions for homelessness

 

The Celebrate Outreach group is teaming up with a University of South Florida professor to help provide shelter to homeless veterans in the Tampa Bay area. The organization contacted Josué Robles Caraballo last year about building what they call “tiny homes” for homeless veterans.

Caraballo accepted the challenge. He designed a class for USF’s spring 2016 semester where students will ultimately create a tiny home prototype. The class meets every Tuesday from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. to discuss different ideas of what the home should include. The students began making models and drawing up designs during the first class.

Caraballo gives students useful feedback to help them improve their models.  Student Chris Loper said he took the class because he wants to help end veteran homelessness.

Caraballo said there are many ways to help the effort. People interested in helping can contact Caraballo or the Celebrate Outreach program.  People do not have to necessarily donate their money. Their time would be greatly appreciated as well.

PKG SCRIPT FORMAT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANCHOR:

 

 

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0:04-0:09

(Tiny Homes/ Tampa, FL)

 

 

 

 

0:09-0:17

Anchor on camera

 

 

0:17-0:26

VO/Greg LaFountain

 

 

 

0:26-0:31

Jose Rubles/USF Professor

 

 

0:31-0:41

VO/Greg LaFountain

 

 

 

0:41-0:49

Chris Loper/USF Student

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANCHOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SLUG: TINY HOMES

NAME: GREG LAFOUNTAIN

 

DATE: Thursday, February 25, 2016

 

INTRO: 0:04

PKG: 1:44

TAG: 0:07

TRT: 1:48

 

 

(Anchor on camera)

 

IT’S A TINY FIX FOR A BIG PROBLEM. A UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA PROFESSOR AND HIS STUDENTS ARE WORKING HARD TO HELP HOMELESS VETERANS IN THE BAY AREA.

 

Take PKG

 

 

 

 

 

IT’S A TINY FIX FOR A BIG PROBLEM. A UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA PROFESSOR AND HIS STUDENTS ARE WORKING HARD TO HELP HOMELESS VETERANS IN THE BAY AREA.

THE CELEBRATE OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTACTED USF PROFESSOR JOSE RUBLES WITH AN IDEA A FEW MONTHS AGO.

 

 

 

“They had this great idea of providing homes for homeless veterans in St Pete.”

 

 

THE PROFESSOR AND HIS STUDENTS ARE HARD AT WORK AT THE SCHOOL OF AGRICUTURE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN. TO STUDENTS LIKE CHRIS LOPER, THIS IS MORE THAN JUST A CLASS.

 

“Homelessness and the issues the extend from that, but then also fusing that with the veteran crises we’re dealing with now.”