A Real Life Sanctuary For Gamer’s

Laser tag is a fun activity and could be compared to a first-person shooter simulator to many gamers. Intended for people of all ages in the Xtreme Adventures Family Center is located in Lutz, Florida. Not only is there a laser tag arena up to six thousand square feet for people to interact, but there is also an arcade zone where people can play over ten arcade games and earn virtual tickets to purchase their prizes with. At the entrance, there is a walk wall that is close to the entrance and dual sided Adventure Turf next to the walk wall. Here people can play a mix of dodgeball, soccer and basketball or be in the bumper car arena.

Gamers can identify with the gaming aspects  while playing laser tag.

Julian Alayon, the laser tag coordinator of Xtreme Adventures, has a better understanding of laser tag as well as gaming and how both of them have a huge correlation with one another.

“For the most part, we have vests that you can wear and they can talk to you, kind of similar how you would play a game and you have a HUD where it tells you your health, how much ammo you have and everything,” Alayon said. “But here it’s much more relaxed and essentially we have most of our game modes have infinite ammo, infinite health, so that way we keep more of the fun to a long extended period of time.”

On Wednesday and Thursday Xtreme Adventures opens at 5 p.m. and closes at 9 p.m. On Friday they close at 11 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Sundays.

Gamer’s Arcade Dreams Come True

Replay Amusement Museum is one of the places in Tarpon Springs where people come to revisit the glory days of old arcade and pinball games. A year and a half ago the museum was put together by Brian Cheney, a collector of classic arcade games, since he ran out of space to keep those games he created the museum to share with the public and continue to collect more.

Skyler Johnson, the manager of the museum, worked along with Cheney.

“This museum is dedicated to promoting the culture, historical significance and artwork of vintage arcade and pinball machines,” Johnson said. “There’s so much artwork, creativity and music involved in these machines that we want to be able to share them and there’s not many places where you can experience these machines that were originally out in public locations for people to play.”

Modern gaming is a lot more story driven and free roaming, but classic arcade games are more challenging and requires learning how many of them work and a lot of practice.

“For example, you can play an arcade game and a lot of people continue all the way through it but maybe the goal is to beat the game in one credit without continuing, ever,” Johnson said.

The Replay Amusement Museum is open Thursday and Sunday through 11 a.m. through seven p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays are 11 a.m. through 11 p.m. It is a great place for people of all ages to enjoy and recapture their gaming experiences.

MSC SkyPad gives students a place of escape

The University of South Florida has one of the biggest buildings called the Marshall Student Center, open from 7 a.m. to midnight on weekdays and varies on Saturdays and Sundays.  It would be very difficult to escort students out when closing time happens because students enjoy themselves in the SkyPad on the 4th floor assisted by Jennifer Hernandez, the Associate Director for Operations of the building.

“Based on some feedback from the students we did not provide enough relaxation space and gaming space,” Hernandez said. “So there were two meeting rooms that were in existence in that space when we first moved in, so it was a minor construction project that we brought online to add that gaming area and the place for students to study.”

The SkyPad is a place where students can have fun by plugging in their video games and play all by themselves or with friends, forming a group together to study and many other things to do.

The Video Game Club President of USF, Adham Hessen, has his experiences at the SkyPad by making friends.

“I particularly enjoy the SkyPad myself, because it’s a place where I actually met my friends and now I continue to meet them up here playing video games together,” Hessen said. “It’s tons of fun. We laugh, made a lot of jokes, but it was fun.”

The SkyPad was created in September 13, 2011 and founded by Joe Synovec, the previous director of the Marshall Student Center. It features a total of seven LCD screen televisions with multiple ways to connect electronics, two dry erase boards for multiple purposes, vending machines for refreshments, plenty of tables to work on studies, couches to recline on and a large studying space that is close to the railing of the building.

 

Dinosaurs in Motion

Gaming technology can open up a new realm of ideas and possibilities to those involved in gaming, computer engineering, and for other fields and occupations. MOSI, the Museum of Science and Industry in Tampa, is the prime example of its technology by bringing dinosaurs to life with levers, pulleys and the Sony PlayStation controllers in their new exhibit “Dinosaurs in Motion.” 

Grayson Kamm, the communications director of MOSI, explained the concept of the mechanics of the way the dinosaurs are manipulated. 

“Controls can get more complex and machines can get more complex,” said Kamm. “So you start with a lever moving the T-Rex all the way up to a PlayStation video game controller, and getting that to work to where you’re using these controls to run electric motors to coordinate everything is not an easy task. 

It’s an interesting experience to everybody who visits MOSI, especially the employees who work at the exhibit. Stephen Shuey, a MOSI employee, has witnessed the visitors’ experiences and expressions with how the PlayStation controller controls the dinosaurs. 

“It’s like manual and game control both are fun,” Shuey said. 

This exhibit expands visitors imagination of what game controllers can do besides controlling something in a video game. Things like controlling robots, a crane, or anything in the real world.  

“By getting to think about new ideas, fresh ways to do different things, that’s what it’s all about at MOSI because the possibilities down the line are going to be totally different and totally endless,” Kamm said.