The Truth Behind the USF Seal

The USF seal is a significant icon to USF history. It’s the first landmark you see on Collins, and in the middle of the Marshall Student center.

But what does it mean?

Jacob Stephenson, a freshman at USF, voices his opinion on the based on the myth he’s heard.

“Yea, I heard that if you step on it you won’t graduate. That’s a given. So pretty sure no one actually steps on it. I’ve seen people step on it, but I’m sure they’re not going to graduate,” Stephenson said.

Fahad Al Raee is also a freshman, and he heard the same rumor from advisors.

“They told me you should not step on the logo because if you do you will not be able to pass,” Raee said.

The Seal was created by Henry Gardner and was first used in the USF Catalog called Accent on Learning. But besides the myth going around campus about the seal, John S. Allen, the USF’s first president defined its meaning.

“President Allen, he knew a lot of the programs here were studying the earth, everything happening on the earth. He by trade was, by his academic background was an astronomer,” Andy Huse said, from Special Collections. “There’s the sun symbolizing knowledge, light, heat, life. The lamp symbolizes enlightenment. The Green corresponds with the Earth, and the Gold corresponds with the Sun.”

 

Rugby pitch cultivates leadership

 

On the USF men’s rugby team, every player has their own story, but team captain Adam Gimbel —a fourth year biochemistry student from Miami— explained the dedication and bond that is unique to rugby.

Gimbel feels that being captain of the team has helped him get the confidence to take on other leadership roles in life.

“I’ve played sports all of my life. I just fell in love with rugby immediately. Physically, emotionally and mentally, it is the most challenging sport I’ve ever played. And because of that it’s the most self-satisfying sport, I’ve ever played.”

In the middle of October, Gimbel suffered a hamstring injury. Unlike in many other sports, he experienced something that is special to rugby, from the player who caused the injury on the field.

“The next day, he messaged me on Facebook, he found me then messaged me. And says ‘hey man, I hope your hamstring gets better bro, I really want to play you in a month.’”

Gimbel explained that Rugby has a great social atmosphere, where players genuinely respect everyone who takes part in the sport.

“This is the culture that’s special to Rugby,” said Gimbel. “Despite how violent and aggressive the game is, at the end of it, it’s all just gentlemen playing the sport.”

A rising club at USF: Eudaimonia

Eudaimonia is a new and rising club at USF giving out free hugs to all who want one every Nov.14.

Jonathon Burroughs, the founder of Eudaimonia, began the club to commemorate a friend who committed suicide on the same day four years ago.

“I started this doing this to commemorate my friend who lost his life to suicide,” Burroughs said. “I do this for him, but some of the other members do it to just spread joy.”

Burroughs started giving out free hugs without the University’s approval, but soon got the go-ahead to continue when he received positive feedback from students.

“Sometimes you do things and you perpetuate events, and you don’t see the results,” Burroughs said. “But the results are there and it’s powerful. For me, it is about believing in the idea that what I’m doing has results that are powerful, even though I don’t see them.”

DMC provides students with equipment to create digital media projects

Elizabeth is just one of many students who uses the Digital Media Commons to check out cameras and other equipment. It’s free of charge to all students and faculty of USF, no matter your major.

DSLRs, Go-Pros, HD cameras and all sorts of audio equipment can be checked out at the DMC for up to 3 days at a time. Whether you’re working on a digital media project or just want to check out cameras for fun, anything is possible at the DMC.

There are many kinds of students that come to the DMC. Beginners and experts flock here to use the workstations. Assistance with programs is available during the operation hours of 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

There is also a green room that students can rent out for experimental projects. They can be on a beach or in Egypt in a matter of seconds.

Anything is a possibility at the DMC, and things are only going to get better. More equipment is said to be coming in the spring semester

If you want to learn more about the DMC, visit their webpage for more information:  https://www.lib.usf.edu/digital-studio.