Hospital Holds Annual Veterans Day Parade

James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital honored veterans Nov. 11 in their ninth annual Veterans Day Parade. More than 1800 participants and 300 volunteers were in attendance for the momentous occasion.

Bruce Waters, U.S. Air Force veteran, learned many life lessons during his service and credits the military for helping him become the man he is today.

“Of all the things that can happen to you in the service, it makes a man out of you or a lady out of you, if you are a woman,” Waters said. “It teaches you responsibility.”

Retired veteran Connie White served in the Air Force for 20 years. She is now a member of the Military Women Across the Nation who walked the parade.

“I took that oath to protect my country, to guide my country in all enemies, foreign and domestic and that oath never ends,” White said. “It is always there.”

Rhonda Crawford grew up in a military family and says although it can be a challenging career, she encourages young women to join the service.

“Go for it—I enjoyed my experience so much,” Crawford said. “It makes you grow as a person that you would not believe possible; the people that you meet and the place you go, they last a lifetime.”

Student Loans Make Students Reconsider Major

Surrounded by dozens of students clicking away on their laptops and flipping through textbooks, Emmanuel Vasquez sits at a booth on the second floor of the USF Library and googles high-paying majors.

“At this point, I’m feeling desperate,” Vasquez said. “Anything that pays off the loans.”

Forty-nine percent of college graduates consider themselves either unemployed or earn low salaries and about half report they are not offered learning experiences that can help advance their potential careers. The number of student loan borrowers as of 2015 has amounted to 43 million, according to Student Loan Hero.

“After resubmitting my FAFSA earlier last week, I realized how financially destructive my degree could be for my future,” Vasquez said. “It’s actually been bugging me for months.”

A common struggle students face during their first years at college is deciding which major to pursue. Most are obligated by the age of 17 to choose a career field and pay thousands of dollars to work towards that degree for four years. The STEM majors — a curriculum of science, technology, engineering and mathematics — are what many students are leaning towards pursuing in order to make up for their student debt.

Vasquez is a USF sophomore and humanities major, a subject he has had a passion for since a young age. However, he is considering changing his major to business before the spring semester.

“The issue stems from this idea that students believe they won’t be successful unless they work towards high demanding jobs,” Dr. Sean Lyons, doctor of management, said.

Dr. Lyons is a professor and researcher at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada who studies career development and expectations of young workers.

“We receive more students who have the potential to be great at subjects they excel at, who then feel they should settle for STEM majors, because they are told that those soft majors they love won’t grant them the income they need,” Dr. Lyons said.

63 percent of college graduates were encouraged to pursue a STEM degree in 2015, according to the Accenture Strategy 2015 U.S. College Graduate Employment Study.

Pablo Alava, a social studies teacher at Guinta Middle School in Brandon, said that the problem is created during early education.

“Things like standardized testing and mandatory grade requirements damage the ability for kids to be creative in things that aren’t generic subjects,” Alava said. “You have a kid who isn’t great at math but is a skill-born musician, and then he gets held back a year and is told that he is incompetent.”

Alava, who has been teaching since 2011 and has a master’s degree in education, has almost finished paying off his student debt.

“I graduated with flying colors and I still needed to depend on the money my parents helped me with as well, as connections I thankfully had from people I knew,” Alava said. “That is how you really make it after college. It’s all about the connections.”

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York states that 62 percent of recent college graduates are working in jobs that require a degree, yet only 27 percent are working in a job that relates to their major.

JoEllen Tharp, a mass communications student adviser for USF, considers the college experience to be a fair game. Most students are required to build connections within their college experiences, as well as complete internships and extracurricular activities.

“You have to maintain that balance of doing what you love, and also being realistic with what your outlook is and what your degree can offer, and make sure that you’re bringing in things to your resume to balance that out,” Tharp said. “Students need to make sure that they are ready to work in multiple fields until they reach the point that their passion and profession can sustain them.”

When it comes to their current jobs, about 53 percent of all employed college graduates in their mid-20s and early 30s say they are “very satisfied” at work, according to a recent study done by the Pew Research Center.

“It’s conflicting, choosing between being happy because I love my job, or being happy because I’m at peace with the money I make,” Vasquez said. “I just want all the money spent and work done to be worth it in the end.”

Clearwater Beach presents annual Chalk Art Festival

The fifth annual Clearwater Beach Chalk Art Festival welcomed local and regional artists to display their talents on the Clearwater Beach sidewalk.

“There are so many amazing artists here,” said artist Julie Greene.

For the festival, Greene drew a chalk version of Omar Rayyan’s “The Favorite” catching the attention of people passing by.

“I love the face on the little girl,” visitor Gust Ristas said about Greene’s drawing.

Greene wasn’t always a chalk artist. She’d been experiencing what she described as an artist’s block until she discovered her chalk art talent.

“I was sitting outside one day and my kids were riding their bikes and scooters and the bucket of sidewalk chalk was sitting next to me and I just started doing these great big quotes,” said Greene about how she got started.

Greene claimed that chalk art helped her get through artist block and even get back into other forms of artwork.

“I felt like the creative juices started flowing again,” Greene said.

The creative juices were flowing for visitors at the festival as well. Singer-songwriter Danny Mcelroy put his talent on display by singing a portion of a song he wrote.

“My dream is to be a musician, you know, and like tour, you know, and make money off of being a performer and musician,” Mcelroy said.

 

 

 

Tampa Bay’s Best: The Florida Aquarium

Florida Aquarium employee Eric Hovland and guest Angela Moody share a passion for marine life and the environment in which they live.

Hovland has seen The Florida Aquarium blossom into the popular Tampa attraction that it is today.

“I’ve worked here at The Florida Aquarium for going on 22 years in May and I’ve loved every minute of it,” Hovland said. “Seeing the facility grow over the years and being able to work with all of the diverse species of marine life on a daily basis has been a dream come true for me.”

Located in downtown Tampa, right next to Port Tampa Bay, The Florida Aquarium offers its patrons a unique experience that is unlike any other aquarium in the United States.

“I had no idea until I got here that you could dive with sharks at this aquarium,” Moody said. “I’ve never heard of anything like that at any other aquarium I’ve ever been to.”

The Florida Aquarium was the first aquarium in the nation to offer an uncaged dive with sharks experience.

“We have the sand tiger sharks and all of our diverse fish that you can get to know,” Hovland said. “Learning about sharks can really accelerate when you can see sharks being sharks.”

People from all over the world travel to Tampa, which in turn brings many diverse people and cultures to The Florida Aquarium.

“Whether they’re getting off a cruise ship and stopping in for a visit, we really do get a diversity of the world’s culture,” Hovland said. “It’s nice to see our impact reaches much further than just the Tampa Bay area.”

For more information, please visit flaquarium.org

No Oven, No Problem

 

Roland Strobel is the co-creator of The Cider Press Cafe located in St.Petersburg. They create tasty dishes from natural ingredients without using an oven, stove or microwave.

“It is a vegan restaurant but we are mainly a raw and gluten free restaurant. We don’t cook a lot of our dishes but we prepare them in ways and process them without cooking them,” Strobel said.

Kitchen manager Christina Barbara has been working at the cafe since it opened August of last year. She has maintained a smooth operating kitchen by making sure the preparation is done correctly.

“The prep work is the main art of the food here basically. That is the most important, the most crucial thing cause if you don’t have that recipe down right then it doesn’t even taste right,” Barbara said.

Barbara has expanded her knowledge of cooking and combining of flavors from working at the cafe.

“Working here will definitely give you a different aspect of life. How to make your vegetables a new way of combining them into everyday eating and healthy living,” Barbara said.

The Cider Press Cafe incorporates paintings from local artists in the community to feature in the restaurant. The cafe also features an event night the first Wednesday of every month where guests can drink wine and beer and paint pictures.

Election Day Voters

 

With only hours before the end of election season, voters are showing up to the polls to show support for their candidate. The Florida vote is one of the most important ones for both candidates.

“The ideology behind having the right to vote; I think it’s a privilege to be able to exercise that right,” Avery Thompson said.

With 29 electoral votes, Florida is a necessity for both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. However, neither of them had an easy run. Both campaigns were plagued with scandals. In fact, Trump announced his candidacy with a sound bite that haunted him on his run to the White House.

The most shocking political revelations came from the democratic side. Hillary Clinton spent most of her candidacy under FBI investigation. Aside from this, her campaign chairman John Podesta’s emails were exposed in 35 separated batches released by WikiLeaks.

Though Clinton fought to steer the attention away from her scandals, voters like Donna Kuntz remember.

“I’m sick and tired of the corruption in Washington,” said Kuntz, “No government and no one person should be above the law.”

For others it’s more about the candidate’s record, like Thompson.

“I just think [Clinton] is a more respectful, qualified candidate,” Thompson said.

Regardless of who is pronounced as the winner, it is important to remember that it’s up to us, as citizens, to work together to make this nation great. It’s not in the hands of Washington politicians to bring us together. We must, as a community, continue to move forward for the next four years.

 

International Diversity Brings Students Together

The International Students Association at the University of South Florida organized International Night on Nov. 13, which is an event how diversity and union could go hand-and-hand.

Samuel Bai is a USF international, graduate student who was invited to perform at the event to show his passion for music. When he was just a little boy, Bai taught himself how to play the flute like his father.

“In China you have to get immersed into the atmosphere and feel the music,” Bai said.

Music, laughter and applause overpowered everything else during the event. Every group that performed included students from around the world and they incorporated their cultures in their performance.

USF Homecoming King, Kenny Ezevillo, hosted the event and showed great enthusiasm.

“The Diversity here is incredible,” Ezevillo said. You get to meet people from all over the place and everyone is so friendly.”

Most of these students are neither dance nor music majors. They join these groups as an outlet from the stress that comes from studying for tests and assignments. At the same time they are embracing new cultures and traditions.

“I think it’s really important to have these kind of events because it really opens culture to anyone who wants to come,” Kori Conklin, a USF molecular and microbiology student, said. “It’s really nice, because you get to experience something that’s not normal to you and it opens your world view.”

 

 

 

Organic Farm Supported by Community

Sweetwater Organic Community Farm is a local farm funded by the community to bring fresh organic produce to the city. They are located at 6942 West Comanche Ave., in the heart of Tampa.

Sweetwater Organic Community Farm started a CSA to raise money for the farm so that they can grow fresh vegetables for families that are interested in eating healthy.

“CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. That frankly means that the community is supporting this farm to grow food for them,” Travis Hansen said.

Hansen has been the farm manager now for two seasons and wants to continue his work at Sweetwater Organic Community Farm. He is very passionate about what he does.

“If you’re not present with love then you’re not going to fully connect with these plants. You’re not going to fully connect with your food that you are bringing to your table,” Hansen said.

That is what Sweetwater Organic Community Farm is all about. They want to educate the community to live a better life style by eating healthy food.

“We are really reaching out to the food desert community that we have around us. So in a 1.5-mile radius it’s considered a food desert, where people do not have access to clean healthy organic food. So we offer a much healthier alternative with organic produce,” Christine Wallace said.

Sunday local vendors set-up booths at the farm to sell their products and farm grown vegetables. Sweetwater Organic Community Farm also offers farm tours every third Sunday of the month as well as educational workshops for adults and children. You can check out their upcoming events on their website at http://sweetwater-organic.org

NFL, MLS Brass Participate in Sport & Entertainment Lecture Series

The University of South Florida’s Sun Dome recently hosted two influential people in the sports world. Tod Leiweke, Chief Operating Officer for the National Football League and Don Garber, the Commissioner of Major League Soccer. The USF Sport & Entertainment Lecture Series is aimed at students studying in USF’S Sport & Entertainment Management program.

Students find it important to have renowned names visiting the university. This is especially true for those in the Sport & Entertainment program.

“First of all, having such important folks that have so much influence in the sports business like Tod Leiweke and Don Garber brings a lot of great attention and educational opportunity to folks in the Tampa area,” said student Payton Phillips. “Our students, our faculty, and our athletic staff [benefit] as well, so it’s able to bring industrious minds and is good to learn from so that we can perform better and learn more.”

The lecture series is a way to show the growing Sport & Entertainment Management program which the university now offers.

“I came here for the basic fact that I wanted to be a Sport Management major, but USF didn’t have that major when I first started,” said Brittany Barber. “I just decided to come to see how I would like it if I wanted to go into it for Grad School because, you know, Grad School is a whole other monster than undergrad. So I just wanted to figure out whether this is something I want to pursue.”

The event took place at USF’s Sun Dome and was presented by Florida Fox Sports and the Tampa Bay Lightning.  The lecture series has taken place annually, with this year being the fourth installment.

Thousands Gathered for Straz Live! in the Park

The annual Straz Live! in the Park was held this past Sunday at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park.

It was a picturesque scene, as thousands gathered to listen to opera and Broadway pieces, selected from the upcoming season at the Straz Center. Children played in the park while parents and other patrons of musical theater enjoyed a warm afternoon of music.

The show opened with an opera program and transitioned to Broadway after a brief intermission. Pieces from Charles Gounod’s Romeo and Juliet, La Cenerentola, Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca were performed during the opera section, while selections from Wicked, Cabaret and Motown: The Musical highlighted the Broadway section.

“We’re here to show you that opera is not scary, it’s a lot of fun,” said the Managing Director of the Opera Tampa, Robin Stamper. “We give you every reason to come to the opera when you come to the Straz Live.”

University of South Florida student Ryan Haft had to agree. He missed the opera section, but commented, “I wasn’t planning on going and seeing anything, but after hearing the girl from Wicked, I might want to go see that.”

It might be too late to see this year’s Straz Live! in the Park but mark your calendars now for the first Sunday, next November. It’s not an event you want to miss.

USF student conquers fears with help of YouTube

A former dream pushed to the side because of fear has now taken form for USF student Jade Lopez. Her channel “Mrs. You’re Welcome” is a reminder for her that she is done letting fear run her life and is prepared to share her story and her talents with those on the other side of the screen.

“I’m so done with fear telling me that I can’t do it or people are going to laugh at you or it’s not going to be good enough, no one’s even going to  watch it,” Lopez said. “I’m just like how ‘bout you shut-up and I’ll prove you wrong.”

Tucked away in the USF library Lopez finds herself fiddling with equipment and editing software while she works between their green room and the Digital Media Commons learning as she goes.

“I don’t know what I’m doing, I literally said that in the first video,” Lopez said. “If the video is crooked I don’t know what I’m doing.”

Though this does not stop her from pursuing her goal, it rather encourages her to make this channel the one that stays. To make this channel the one that is true to her personality and her style. To make this channel the one that inspire others. Stating that she wants her viewers to:

“Realize that they are enough.”

Which is something her friend Briana Brown already finds she is accomplishing.

“She has a bright future with this channel,” Brown said. “She is kind of filling that void in the YouTube community where there needs to be a positive energy or a refreshing light.”

Only time will show what impact Lopez’s channel will leave, but for now her possibilities are seemingly endless.

If you want to see more from Jade find her here at: Mrs. You’re Welcome

Tampa Bay Lightning Host Hockey Fights Cancer Game

The Tampa Bay Lightning and members of the Tampa Bay community came together Nov. 3 to join the fight against cancer at the Lightning’s Hockey Fights Cancer game.

“It’s really important that we lead by example and we inspire others and in the fight against cancer I think we all know someone fighting that fight,” said Lightning Foundation Executive Director Elizabeth Frazier.

Players rallied together; wearing purple jerseys with purple taped hockey sticks to show their support for the cause.

“It means so much to see the entire community give it their all to support people like myself,” said Kerry Roopchand, Moffitt Cancer Center patient.

The event will benefit research efforts at Moffitt, the Lightning’s charitable partner, to help find a cure for cancer. Moffitt team members were taken back by the support.

“It’s so amazing to see such a turnout from our community to help with the prevention and cure of cancer,” said Dr. Damon Reed, Moffitt sarcoma department medical director.

To learn more about the NHL’s Hockey Fights Cancer initiative, visit https://www.nhl.com/community/hockey-fights-cancer.

The Environment: Where Some See Progress, Others Are Disillusioned

Laurie Walker bustles about the southwestern corner of the USF campus, where lies a 16-acre space of greenery frequented by human visitors, bees, butterflies and two resident cats.

It was 1969 when the university established its Botanical Gardens, which serves as a breath of fresh air for the community as well as a home and research center for plants and animals.  Walker has been the director of the Botanical Gardens for 15 years.

Despite the soothing quietness of the gardens, worries about environmental degradation and health bubble underneath.  Having to protect plants from damaging weather is always a challenge, suggests Walker.  But newer challenges keep rising to the surface.

On site is an apiary used in the gardens’ yearlong beekeeping course.  The effects on bees were deeply felt this year.

“We were not able to collect honey this year,” said Walker. “There was just not enough honey to take. And we don’t do it for commercial purposes. We just do it as an educational component of the course.  But our honeybees have not been stockpiling honey.”

Step outside of the gardens and back into the day-to-day of Tampa Bay, and you’ll find that concern about the environment comes second.

“Everyone cares about the economy, which I can understand because people are concerned about ‘I need to feed my family, I need to feed myself,’” said Samantha Szatyari, a junior environmental science and policy major.

Dr. Susan MacManus, a distinguished professor of political science at USF, confirmed this sentiment.  MacManus notes that just because jobs and economy are at the top of the list does not mean Floridians don’t see its importance.  Many move to Florida because of its environment, so its health is already near the forefront of their minds.

MacManus directs the USF-Nielsen Sunshine State Survey, which concluded last month that the environment was the second most pressing issue for Floridians.

“The environment will absolutely intensify as an issue because of its high priority for younger people,” said MacManus.

Walker holds on to this as hope.

“Easier said than done, but I think young people now, college students, get this, and with social networks, that information can get out to others,” said Walker.

But some college students are not so sure. At the very least, they don’t think their peers care enough.

“Back home, one of the major problems that we have is people throwing garbage,” said Awa Ndiaye, a sophomore engineering student. “You walk down the streets and you see a bunch of plastic bags or you see a bunch of trash that shouldn’t be there and it’s something that directly impacts your life.”

Home for Ndiaye is Senegal, where she says the difference in approach to the environment is an awareness issue—lack of knowledge generates inaction.  But in the U.S., she says, it’s apathy.

“Here, a lot of the people I’ve been around—they’re kind of conscious of climate change and environmental issues, but they don’t care because at the end of the day it doesn’t affect them,” said Ndiaye. “If they waste water or if they’re wasting food, it doesn’t matter to them because at the end of the day, they still get food.”

Inaction is also exacerbated by the feeling that it’s too big of a problem for a single person to tackle, both Ndiaye and Szatyari say.

But it’s also a matter of wanting instant gratification.

“To take care of the environment is to make an investment in the future,” said Szatyari.  “A lot of people don’t want to make that investment.  People want to see results now.”

Szatyari, who is also the director of networking for the Student Environmental Association at USF, felt her view was fairly pessimistic, but nonetheless true.  Still, she continues to be active.

“There’s that disillusionment, but then there’s that ‘well what if I can be that voice of change?’” said Szatyari.

To Walker, young people can be that voice.

“Few people understand that one person can make a difference,” said Walker. “We have to be vocal, we have to get the word out. We have to educate people.”

Sexual Assault Silence

The University of South Florida launched the annual “It’s On Us” campaign this month, which calls for students to stand up against sexual violence on college campuses through events like taking a pledge and the “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes.”

The campaign comes hard on the heels of a recent sexual assault that occurred on USF’s campus. The university received national attention when a member of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity was accused of sexually assaulting a young woman at a party.

Although one of the tools of the national “It’s On Us” campaign is to talk to your friends honestly and openly about sexual assault, many students at the university were unwilling to speak about sexual assaults on college campuses.

“It happened within Greek, yet it also could happen anywhere, for any other person who is not involved in an organization. But I think they should be talking about it,” said USF and Greek alumna Savannah Skuthan. “If it’s ‘on you,’ why aren’t you doing anything about it?”

According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, approximately 23.1 percent of females and 5.4 percent of males will be the victim of sexual assault during their undergraduate career.

“I think people get worried about whether [reporting sexual assault] is going to be anonymous, whether they feel like they’re betraying someone,” said USF student Liz Stafford.

Conversations around sexual assault share this sentiment, as shown by a RAINN study in which 10 percent of college-aged females and 14 percent of college-aged males did not want to report a sexual assault fearing the alleged perpetrator would get in trouble.

 

 

 

Brandon Ice Rink Helps Students Learn to Skate

The Tampa Bay Lightning made a terrific run to the Stanley Cup semifinals last hockey season, which has recently prompted an increased interest in ice skating and hockey in the Tampa Bay area.

One of the few ice skating rinks in Tampa is located in Brandon, where the Lightning practice and visit quite often. The Brandon Ice Sports Forum houses a highly qualified staff and hosts many students who have attended the rink for years.

“My favorite thing about skating is how beautiful of a sport it is and how free it makes you feel,” current student Isabella Ramirez said. “It teaches you a lot of life lessons like to always get up when you fall down.”

Courtney O’Connor, a former student turned coach, is one of the main coaches at the rink. O’Connor works six days a week making sure her students receive the best training.

“I get to share the love that I have for ice skating with my students,” O’Connor said. “It’s really nice to be able to see them out there on the ice, skating, having a smile on their face and having that enjoyment.”

O’Connor has been coaching for four years and has plans to keep coaching for as long as she can. She has also been skating since she was three.

The Brandon Ice Sports Forum works closely with each student through private lessons and other skating classes. One of the most popular skating classes the ice rink offers is “Learn to Skate.” This class gives children and even adults the opportunity to learn skills that ice skaters and hockey players acquire through years of training.

To sign up for “Learn to Skate” or any other classes with the Brandon Ice Sports Forum, please visit http://www.theicesportsforum.com/.

USF Football Struggles to Attract Student Fans

The USF Football team is 6-1, but you wouldn’t be able to tell by looking in the stands.

After a massive showing by the students against FSU, the football team has been left with little fan support in the student section. The 11,000 student representatives who made the commute to Raymond James Stadium for the FSU game devolved into a crowd of 2,000 two weeks later for a homecoming week matchup against East Carolina.

“I was extremely disappointed in that game,” Student Bulls Club President Hailey Piana said. “When you ask around, when you put on Facebook ‘Hey, where are y’all at?’ people say ‘Oh, well it’s a noon game, it’s hot.’ It’s all these excuses.”

In fact, Facebook class pages have been rife with arguments revolving around attendance for USF football games. There are many students who feel the football team deserves better attendance, and have been unafraid to let their peers know.

None of it has changed the attendance numbers, however, as the student attendance for the following week tallied 3,000 students.

Longtime fan and USF alumni Collin Sherwin weighed in, saying that the football culture of USF simply fell off following a memorable 2007 season.

“USF was the number 2 team in the country at the time and it just sort of took off and became part of this campus. What happened from the early part from this decade, forward, was a lot of that enthusiasm for this program just fell off. That’s got to change for USF to get where it wants to go [as a program].”

The Office of Veteran Success Lends a Helping Hand

The University of South Florida was just named the best 4-year college in the nation for veterans.

USF’s Office of Veteran Success serves over 1500 student vets. Some of the programs that they offer are vet-to-vet tutoring, mentoring, success classes, VA work-studies and community networking events. The purpose of each program is to provide veterans with the necessary skills to succeed.

The office also works with USF staff members to help veterans transition back into school. Staff members can attend the “Got Your Six” workshop, which teaches them how to become better resources for student veterans.

Daniel McNeill is the office manager for the Office of Veterans Success. He says that the program is an overview of common stereotypes, strengths, weaknesses and ways to help veterans adapt back into academia.

“We created this presentation to educate USF faculty and staff to allow our veterans to transition more easily,” said McNeill.

McNeill also said that one thing he hopes that staff members take away from “Got Your Six” is that the transition phase isn’t something to take lightly. Student veterans are making drastic life changes, and they need support from faculty during this time.

Dr. Laura Anderson, a chemistry professor at USF, attended “Got Your Six” because she wanted to learn different ways to help student veterans in her classes.

Student veteran, Victor Perez, served in the Navy and is transitioning back into school. He says that the office has really helped him get back into the school mindset.

“The office of Veteran Success has taught me about all of the benefits that I could be eligible for… especially vet-to-vet tutoring [and] mentoring,” said Perez.

A Unique Haunted House in the Tampa Bay Area

Chamber of Terror is a haunted house located near Channelside in the port of Tampa Bay. What makes it so unique is that it’s aboard the S.S. Victory World War II Ship. The creator, Courtney McIntyre, has made a nautical haunted ship, where there are only five in the United States.

The Chamber of Terror is a walk-through, 30 minute haunted house with four levels and 50 actors, which guarantees you to get scared. Unlike the usual theme park haunted houses, Chamber of Terror is more intimate, letting in up to six people at a time.

“You’re not looking down the hallway and seeing 100 people in front of you end up getting scared and then you end up not getting scared,” McIntyre said.

McIntyre first gained attention from the ship’s director at his haunted house last year in South Tampa. The director loved what he created and asked if he would like to create a haunted attraction aboard the S.S. Victory.

“Basically since November of last year we’ve been planning on doing it here,” McIntyre said, “Everybody seems excited it’s really unique, nothing you can get like this in Florida.”

Guests lined up to walk through the scary ship. Pamala Jones was very impressed by the theme and how it was different from the typical haunted houses.

“I’m from up north and we’ve got really good haunted houses,” Jones said, “This is great; it was very scary.”

Chamber of Terror is open every weekend night for the month of October. On Thursday Oct. 20th they will give five dollars off admission with a valid student ID.

Practice More Self-Love

ZenChristian Mott is a unique college student. She runs a very successful blog that is catered to assist incoming female students, called http://www.peacencurlz.com/.

At the age of 20, this University of South Florida student is a mentor, yoga instructor, author, blogger and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu instructor.

“It is kind of for everybody. It’s a personal and natural hair blog,” Mott said. She describes the blog additionally by saying it is for, “women in the college lifestyle, love at being 20 and being young in this generation”.

Mott is a junior. She is also a double major in English and psychology. She is focusing on psychology as it pertains to childhood trauma. The blog began as an assignment for her creative writing class.

Subscriber Brittney Ball follows http://www.peacencurlz.com/ regularly and particularly enjoyed Mott’s posts. When asked what about Mott made her subscribe, Ball said, “Zen’s a junior, so she’s spent a little time in college and understands the difficulties and I think she has a nice perspective”.

Mott is passionate and wants to help people. She is careful to say that the website has no racial preference. When asked what incoming freshman could stand to gain from her blog, Mott responded, “practice self-love more.”

 

Drawing inspiration from art

What do you want to do before you die? Is a question that one public art project is asking people daily.

Located in Downtown Tampa, the Before I Die Wall stands on Tampa’s Riverwalk serving as a means of expression for those in the Bay Area due to the work of Leadership Tampa Bay’s Class of 2016. A program that teaches those involved how to become more involved and better stewards for their communities.

According to Todd Edwards, a Leadership Tampa Bay 2016 class member, this project came to life by an artist named Candy Chang as a coping mechanism for her depression, though to her surprise it gained the attention of others. Now years later that wall she created for herself has produced 1,000 boards that have spanned 70 countries and 36 languages giving countless people the gift of personal expression.

“To be able to express oneself in a public forum, without being judged, you can’t put a price on that,” said Edwards.

Which is an idea that Dawn Federspiel, a woman who visits the wall almost every day understands and enjoys. Sitting along the wall for hours Federspiel creates and re-creates others words by smudging the chalk into beautiful messages and images.

“Life is a value. Love is a value. People are a value,” said Federspiel. “So this is why I come out here and do this, just to be an inspiration”

Federspiel uses the wall not only to inspire but to also help her cope with her own past.

“Let me tell you it’s been a long journey, okay,” said Federspiel.

The Before I Die Wall can be visited at any time and will stay downtown until January 2017 when it will be relocated to a permanent location at Tampa’s Armature Works.